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Hi and happy new year to all of you,

I have a String like "3-5;9-13;15;20-49". I want to use a RegEx to:

first, check as far as possible, if the syntax is correct... meaning: the ranges are separated by a semicolon and a range is defined by x-y or just x (where x and y are decimals) (the order of the ranges or x

I think I must have some mistake(s) in my RegEx, because matches() gives false although the string is syntactically correct and find() or group() give me the given ranges...?? If I alter the RegEx slightly...I get matches() to return true, but I can´t get the "ranges" with find() or group().

What am I doing wrong?

regards, yves

the code:

    import java.util.regex.Matcher;
    import java.util.regex.Pattern;


    public class RangeRegEx {


        public static void main(String[] args) {


            String rangeExample =  "1-5;7;12-22;50-56;60-90;95;";

            String rangeRegEx = "(\\d+(-\\d+)?)";  // matches returnes false, but find() and group() return correct groups

            System.out.println ("Variant 1 \""+printRegEx(rangeRegEx)+"\":\n--------------------\n");

            Pattern mrPattern = Pattern.compile(rangeRegEx);

            Matcher m = mrPattern.matcher(rangeExample);

            System.out.println ("RegEx matches() -> "+m.matches());
            m.reset();

            while (m.find()) {
                System.out.println(m.group());
            }


            rangeRegEx = "((\\d+)(-\\d+)?(;)?)+";    // matches() returns true, but find() and group() do not work...

            System.out.println ("\n\nVariant 2 \""+printRegEx(rangeRegEx)+"\":\n--------------------\n");

            mrPattern = Pattern.compile(rangeRegEx);

            m = mrPattern.matcher(rangeExample);

            System.out.println ("RegEx matches() -> "+m.matches());
            m.reset();

            while (m.find()) {
                System.out.println(m.group());
            }



        }

        public static String printRegEx(String regEx){
            StringBuffer s=new StringBuffer();
            for (int c=0;c<regEx.length();c++){
                char ch=regEx.charAt(c);
                s.append(ch);
                if (ch == '\\') s.append("\\");
            }
            return s.toString();
        }
    }

Running the code given above prints the following message to the console:

    Variant 1 "(\\d+(-\\d+)?)":
    --------------------

    RegEx matches() -> false
    1-5
    7
    12-22
    50-56
    60-90
    95


    Variant 2 "((\\d+)(-\\d+)?(;)?)+":
    --------------------

    RegEx matches() -> true
    1-5;7;12-22;50-56;60-90;95;
share|improve this question
    
Why do you reuse the variables for different things? It is confusing. –  user270349 Jan 8 at 12:32
    
sorry for confusing... for test purposes I wanted to keep it simple not using too much variables... its just topdown code. –  Yves030 Jan 8 at 13:07
    
THANK YOU ALL for your efforts. Amazing how fast and helpful the crowd is. The answer is: there is no answer... I misunderstood the concept of matches(). Thanks to user270349 for making this clearer. –  Yves030 Jan 8 at 13:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The matches() method (doc) tries to match the whole input. This is why first .matches() returns false with pattern (\\d+(-\\d+)?) that is made to look for a single range. A call to group() or group(0) returns the whole match if any.

The find() method (doc) tries to match something in the beginning but it does not need to match the whole input, so it does return true with the same pattern and same input.

To find different matches of the same pattern you need to use find() in a loop. Calling match() is useless here.

Remember groups are numbered as encountered starting from the left.

mrPattern = Pattern.compile("((\\d+)(-\\d+)?)(;)?");
m = mrPattern.matcher("1-5;7;12-22;50-56;60-90;95;");
while (m.find()) {
    System.out.println(m.group(1));
}
share|improve this answer
    
so there is NO way to use ONE RegEx for this purpose? I mean to check if the syntax is correct at all AND return the groups by looping with find()?? –  Yves030 Jan 8 at 12:55
    
No, I don't think you can. If you use matches() and a repetitive group (something)* it matches multiple things but it is a single group, with group(grpNumber) you get the last match of that group. –  user270349 Jan 8 at 12:57
    
To iterate you need to use find. One way to validate with the same regex is iterating with find() to see if it, step by step, ends consuming the whole input. –  user270349 Jan 8 at 12:58

Try this one.

(\\d+-\\d+|\\d+)(;(\\d+-\\d+|\\d+))*;?

This defines the following:
1) range is either a number or number-number
2) number is any sequence of digits
3) you have >= 1 ranges, each two consecutive ones are separated by exactly one ;
4) you may have but also may not have ; at the end

Note that 0010-0001 will also be considered a valid range by my regexp.

Based on your comment below: here is what you're trying to achieve. You need another/simpler regexp for this.

import java.util.regex.Matcher;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;

public class RangeRegEx {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        String rangeExample = "1-5;7;12-22;50-56;60-90;95";

        String rangeRegEx = "(\\d+-\\d+|\\d+)";

        Pattern mrPattern = Pattern.compile(rangeRegEx);

        Matcher m = mrPattern.matcher(rangeExample);

        while (m.find()) {
            System.out.println(m.group(1));
            System.out.println("===");
        }
    }

}

Another example.

import java.util.regex.Matcher;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;

public class RangeRegEx {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        String rangeExample = "1-5;7;12-22;50-56;60-90;95;";

        String rangeRegEx = "(\\d+-\\d+|\\d+);(\\d+-\\d+|\\d+);(\\d+-\\d+|\\d+);(\\d+-\\d+|\\d+);(\\d+-\\d+|\\d+);(\\d+-\\d+|\\d+);";

        Pattern mrPattern = Pattern.compile(rangeRegEx);

        Matcher m = mrPattern.matcher(rangeExample);
        System.out.println(m.matches());
        m.reset();

        while (m.find()) {
            System.out.println(m.group(1));
            System.out.println(m.group(2));
            System.out.println(m.group(3));
            System.out.println(m.group(4));
            System.out.println(m.group(5));
            System.out.println(m.group(6));
        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
that was fast... thank you. Unfortunately it gives the same result... matches() returns true, but I cannot get the single ranges with find() and group(). I only get one group... and thats the given String.. –  Yves030 Jan 8 at 12:36
    
@Yves030 See updated answer. –  peter.petrov Jan 8 at 12:47
    
@Yves030 So all in all, the conclusion is that you had done this yourself already. And that's normal behavior you're seeing. –  peter.petrov Jan 8 at 12:49
    
So there doesn´t exist an "one-method-way" to check with ONE RegEx if a given String follow the syntax rules AND extracting the range-groups with find() and group()?? Do I really have to use two RegExes.. one to check the Syntax and one to extract the groups? –  Yves030 Jan 8 at 12:59
    
@Yves030 "Do I really have to use two RegExes. one to check the Syntax and one to extract the groups?" I would recommend you do so. –  peter.petrov Jan 8 at 13:03

This should capture the ranges into groups. If you don't want that, I will change it.

(\d+-\d+|\d+);?

I tested it on the following strings, all of which match:

3-5;

3-5;9-13;

3-5;9-13;15;

3-5;9-13;15;20-49


If you want to validate the entire string before getting the groups, you can use a positive lookahead like this:

(?=validation_regex)(capture group)

For example:

(?=(?:(?:\d+-\d+|\d+);?)+)(\d+-\d+|\d+);?

The same mechanism is used in password validation.

share|improve this answer
    
extracting the groups was not the original problem... the misunderstanding was to have one RegEx where the method matches() checks against the given String to check the correct syntax at all and to have find() and group() extract the groups. As I understood now, this is not possible with groups –  Yves030 Jan 8 at 13:05
    
So you wanted one regex to be used in a few different types of functions? Yeah that won't work out :P I did add a section that talks about positive lookaheads for validation though. –  Vasili Syrakis Jan 8 at 22:47

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