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I've got the following code:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $usage = "Usage: $0 <infile.txt> <outfile.txt>\n";
my $infile = shift or die $usage;
my $outfile = shift or die $usage;

open (my $data, "<", $infile) or die "There was a problem opening: $!";
my @primers = <$data>;
close $data;
chomp @primers;

use Algorithm::Combinatorics qw(combinations);
my $strings = \@primers;
my $iter = combinations($strings, 2);
open(my $fh, '>', $outfile);
while (my $c = $iter->next) {
    print $fh join('',@$c) ."\n";
}

Which works just fine however I would prefer if the user did not have to specify the output directory and filename. Is there an easy way to get Perl to print the output to the same directory as infile but also giving the output file a specific name such as 'output.txt'?

Any pointers would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks.

SOLVED:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $usage = "Usage: $0 <infile.txt>\n";
my $infile = shift or die $usage;
use File::Basename;
my $DIR = dirname($infile);
my $outfile = $DIR . "/results.txt" or die $usage;

open (my $data, "<", $infile) or die "There was a problem opening: $!";
my @primers = <$data>;
close $data;
chomp @primers;

use Algorithm::Combinatorics qw(combinations);
my $strings = \@primers;
my $iter = combinations($strings, 2);
open(my $fh, '>', $outfile);
while (my $c = $iter->next) {
    print $fh join('',@$c) ."\n";
}
print ("Finished. The results are located at $outfile\n\n");
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I understand you correctly, you are trying to write the output to the same directory as input file. If so, you can use File::Basename module to get the directory of the input file.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! This is just what I needed. –  TJCooper Jan 8 at 14:35

How about

my $outfile=$infile . ".combinations"

Or, better yet, use stdin and stdout.

(also, check that your outfile was opened succesfully)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That does help however I was more hoping I could have an input file that is say input.txt and the output is then output.txt rather than using the original input filename and adding to it. Is that possible? –  TJCooper Jan 8 at 14:23
    
In that case, @sunil_mlec has the answer you need. Use dirname() to extract the directory, then append your desired filename. Or, if you want to preserve teh extension (suffix), use filepase() to get both the directory and the extension. –  Arkadiy Jan 8 at 14:26

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