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In Perl, I use the following one line statements to pull matches out of a string via regular expressions and assign them. This one finds a single match and assigns it to a string:

my $string = "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.";

my $extractString = ($string =~ m{fox (.*?) dog})[0];

Result: $extractString == 'jumps over the lazy'

And this one creates an array from multiple matches:

my $string = "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.";

my @extractArray = $string =~ m{the (.*?) fox .*?the (.*?) dog};

Result: @extractArray == ['quick brown', 'lazy']

Is there an equivalent way to create these one-liners in Ruby?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
string = "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog."

extract_string = string[/fox (.*?) dog/, 1]
# => "jumps over the lazy"

extract_array = string.scan(/the (.*?) fox .*?the (.*?) dog/).first
# => ["quick brown", "lazy"]

This approach will also return nil (instead of throwing an error) if no match is found.

extract_string = string[/MISSING_CAT (.*?) dog/, 1]
# => nil

extract_array = string.scan(/the (.*?) MISSING_CAT .*?the (.*?) dog/).first
# => nil
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Use String#match and MatchData#[] or MatchData#captures to get matched backreferences.

s = "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog."

s.match(/fox (.*?) dog/)[1]
# => "jumps over the lazy"
s.match(/fox (.*?) dog/).captures
# => ["jumps over the lazy"]

s.match(/the (.*?) fox .*?the (.*?) dog/)[1..2]
# => ["quick brown", "lazy"]
s.match(/the (.*?) fox .*?the (.*?) dog/).captures
# => ["quick brown", "lazy"]

UPDATE

To avoid undefined method [] error:

(s.match(/fox (.*?) cat/) || [])[1]
# => nil
(s.match(/the (.*?) fox .*?the (.*?) cat/) || [])[1..2]
# => nil
(s.match(/the (.*?) fox .*?the (.*?) cat/) || [])[1..-1] # instead of .captures
# => nil
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Discovered a problem with the s.match(/fox (.*?) dog/)[1] approach. If a match is not found, Ruby 2.1 throws an "undefined method []" error. For example, change it to s.match(/fox (.*?) cat/)[1]` and it will choke. –  Alan W. Smith Jan 16 '14 at 3:01
    
@AlanW.Smith, I updated the answer. (s.match(/fox (.*?) cat/) || [])[1] –  falsetru Jan 16 '14 at 3:05

First, be careful thinking in Perl terms when writing in Ruby. We do things a bit more verbosely to make the code more readable.

I'd write my @extractArray = $string =~ m{the (.*?) fox .*?the (.*?) dog}; as:

string = "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog."

string[/the (.*?) fox .*?the (.*?) dog/]
extract_array = $1, $2
# => ["quick brown", "lazy"]

Ruby, like Perl, is aware of the capture groups, and assigns them to values $1, $2, etc. Those make it very clean and clear when grabbing values and assigning them later. The regex engine lets you create and assign named captures also, but they tend to obscure what's happening, so, for clarity, I tend to go this way.

We can use match to get there too:

/the (.*?) fox .*?the (.*?) dog/.match(string) # => #<MatchData "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog" 1:"quick brown" 2:"lazy">

but is the end result more readable?

extract_array = /the (.*?) fox .*?the (.*?) dog/.match(string)[1..-1] 
# => ["quick brown", "lazy"]

The named captures are interesting too:

/the (?<quick_brown>.*?) fox .*?the (?<lazy>.*?) dog/ =~ string
quick_brown # => "quick brown"
lazy # => "lazy"

But they result in wondering where those variables were initialized and assigned; I sure don't look in regular expressions for those to occur, so it's potentially confusing to others, and becomes a maintenance issue again.


Cary says:

To elaborate a little on named captures, if match_data = string.match /the (?.?) fox .?the (?.*?) dog/, then match_data[:quick_brown] # => "quick brown" and match_data[:lazy] # => "lazy" (as well as quick_brown # => "quick brown" and lazy # => "lazy"). With named captures available, I see no reason for using global variables or Regexp.last_match, etc.

Yes, but there's some smell there too.

We can use values_at with the MatchData result of match to retrieve the values captured, but there are some unintuitive behaviors in the class that turn me off:

/the (?<quick_brown>.*?) fox .*?the (?<lazy>.*?) dog/.match(string)['lazy']

works, and implies that MatchData knows how to behave like a Hash:

{'lazy' => 'dog'}['lazy'] # => "dog"

and it has a values_at method, like Hash, but it doesn't work intuitively:

/the (?<quick_brown>.*?) fox .*?the (?<lazy>.*?) dog/.match(string).values_at('lazy') # => 
# ~> -:6:in `values_at': no implicit conversion of String into Integer (TypeError)

Whereas:

/the (?<quick_brown>.*?) fox .*?the (?<lazy>.*?) dog/.match(string).values_at(2) # => ["lazy"]

which now acts like an Array:

['all captures', 'quick brown', 'lazy'].values_at(2) # => ["lazy"]

I want consistency and this makes my head hurt.

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1  
I don't think it is clean to keep the match results in global variables. That is just a bad heritage from Perl. If you can do things without global variables, then that is preferable. I personally have an experience when I tried to access the global match variables when I have regex matches in nested code, and it was a mess. –  sawa Jan 8 '14 at 16:20
1  
Those "globals" are there anyway, they didn't occur just because they were used in an assignment. And, yes, they are Perlisms, but one of the more useful ones. They're overwritten by any subsequent use of a regex, including in called routines, so it's important to remember they're volatile; Grab them immediately and don't count on them being available anywhere else. –  the Tin Man Jan 8 '14 at 16:30
    
I know that they are there. But you can just ignore them. You cannot avoid their existence, but you can forget about them, which would make a cleaner code. –  sawa Jan 8 '14 at 16:32
    
To elaborate a little on named captures, if match_data = string.match /the (?<quick_brown>.*?) fox .*?the (?<lazy>.*?) dog/, then match_data[:quick_brown] # => "quick brown" and match_data[:lazy] # => "lazy" (as well as quick_brown # => "quick brown" and lazy # => "lazy"). With named captures available, I see no reason for using global variables or Regexp.last_match, etc. –  Cary Swoveland Jan 8 '14 at 19:37
1  
Except that there are a lot of 1.8.7 installations in use, especially on shared hosts, that can't use them. 1.8.7 isn't supported by the Ruby developers, but it's still installed on a huge number of hosts where I work, and those hosts are used by an even larger number of users. It's life in the internet universe. Also, while using $1 seems old-school or dangerous, it's not going away for a while. There's a lot of Ruby code using it. That deprecation process will be painful. –  the Tin Man Jan 8 '14 at 20:13

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