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>>> 3 > 2 == True
 False  #say what?
>>> (3 > 2) == True
 True
>>> 3 > (2 == True)
 True
>>> 3 > 1 == True
 True
>>> 3 > False
 True

What is Python doing in its godforsaken hidden logics that makes that first statement False, while the rest are True?

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marked as duplicate by Martijn Pieters, delnan, Felix Yan, Jonesy, talonmies Apr 7 '14 at 5:06

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Comparison chaining doesn't work the way you think it does. See the third paragraph here: docs.python.org/3/reference/expressions.html#not-in –  Henry Keiter Jan 8 '14 at 17:09
2  
And 1 == True is True because bool is a subclass of int and True == 1 and False == 0. Which is also why 3 > True is true, and 0 < True is true, but 0 > False is not.. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 8 '14 at 17:10
1  
Also, I don't know if you're making this mistake, but a common mistake is to do something akin to if 3 > 2 == True:, when they mean if 3 > 2:. You'll almost never want to test if something explicitly == True in python. –  Joe Kington Jan 8 '14 at 17:10
1  
@Neftas: No, only 0 == False is true. Every other number is not equal to False. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 8 '14 at 17:12
    
This was for a lecture, I was explaining the different comparison operators. What I meant was the second line (3>2) == True, just to show them what can be done. –  Andrew Jan 8 '14 at 17:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

This is a chained comparison (see here in the docs), the same way that

>>> 1 < 2 < 3
True

is

>>> (1 < 2) and (2 < 3)
True

In this case, we have

>>> 3 > 2 == True
False

because

>>> (3 > 2) and (2 == True)
False

because

>>> (3 > 2), (2 == True)
(True, False)
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2  
And 1 == True is true because bool is a subclass of int. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 8 '14 at 17:10
    
And 3 > True is true for the same reasons. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 8 '14 at 17:11
    
Well said @DSM. Thanks much. Hooray for python playing fast and loose with the rules of precedence for the sake of a minor convenience! –  Andrew Jan 8 '14 at 17:26
1  
@Andrew: glad to help. But respectfully, if you haven't seen this before, you haven't used Python enough in real programs to decide whether or not the convenience is worth it. FWIW I find it so. –  DSM Jan 8 '14 at 17:28

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