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How can I get access to the source code of shared libraries used in an executable? Here, I used "ldd" to get the name of those libraries:

ldd /bin/ls

linux-vdso.so.1 =>  (0x00007fff43ab0000)
libselinux.so.1 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libselinux.so.1 (0x00007f305a0c8000)
librt.so.1 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/librt.so.1 (0x00007f3059ebf000)
libacl.so.1 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libacl.so.1 (0x00007f3059cb7000)
libc.so.6 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6 (0x00007f30598f7000)
libdl.so.2 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libdl.so.2 (0x00007f30596f2000)
/lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 (0x00007f305a307000)
libpthread.so.0 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libpthread.so.0 (0x00007f30594d5000)
libattr.so.1 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libattr.so.1 (0x00007f30592d0000

Is there also any integrated repository to download the source code of a bunch of these libraries in a single rar file?

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1 Answer 1

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How can I get access to the source code of shared libraries used in an executable?

You figure out which package provides these libraries, and then install corresponding source (and possibly -dbg) package (if one is provided by your distribution).

For example, linux-vdso is part of your kernel, and does not have any debug info (it's not a "real" shared library, and doesn't exist anywhere on disk).

The librt, libc, libdl, libpthread and ld-linux are all part of glibc (libc6 package). On Ubuntu, apt-get install libc6-dbg will get you debug symbols, and apt-get source libc6 -- sources for them (see also Andreas's comment).

Continuing with libselinux:

$ dpkg -S /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libselinux.so.1
libselinux1: /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libselinux.so.1

So libselinux1 is the package that provides this library.

$ apt-cache search libselinux1
libselinux1 - SELinux runtime shared libraries
libselinux1-dev - SELinux development headers

Looks like a separate dbg package is not provided for it; you'll have to build it from source.

Is there also any integrated repository to download the source code of a bunch of these libraries in a single rar file?

No.

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There is no guarantee that "debug" packages would include source code. Specifically in Debian, they only contain detached symbol objects, so that a debugger or stack trace dumper can put names to addresses. If you want the source of packages in Debian, use apt-get source nameofthepackage. This requires deb-src repository entries in /etc/apt/sources.list. –  Andreas Bombe Jan 11 at 21:40

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