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I am trying to dynamically instantiate classes descendant of an abstract class, but the activator is forcing me to override the constructor to every descendant. Is there a way to avoid this?

P.S: I need to pass the parameters in the constructor, only there it can be Write, otherwise, it will always be read!

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5  
You can't override constructors... and it's not clear what your StackOverflow class has in it... –  Jon Skeet Jan 8 '14 at 17:20
5  
You should not prefix class name with I, even if the class is abstract. –  MarcinJuraszek Jan 8 '14 at 17:21
    
Why is your class abstract? It is not obvious from the post. –  ja72 Jan 8 '14 at 17:21
    
I came from Delphi programming, maybe there is another way to do what I want... –  EProgrammerNotFound Jan 8 '14 at 17:22
1  
Well you can't create an instance of just an abstract class. There has to be a concrete derived class. Do you have such a class? It would really help if you'd provide a short but complete program demonstrating the problem. –  Jon Skeet Jan 8 '14 at 17:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Constructors are not inherited, so if you must instantiate a child object through a constructor with those parameters, then you need to write a new constructor in the child class that basically does base(p1, p2, ..., pn).

Looking at your code, seems that your constructors only assign/initialize fields, so there is no reason why you can't do that somewhere outside the constructor, as long as you control it appropriately. This might be a long shot, but I feel this is more what you want:

public abstract class Parent
{
    protected bool foo
    {
        get;
        private set; // just set the property setter as private
    }

    protected Parent() {
        // protected so all instances are created through createAnotherX
        // note that nothing is initialized here!
    }

    public abstract int Enter(); // To override in child classes

    // Option 1: use generics
    public static T createAnother1<T>(bool f) where T : Parent, new()
    {
        T p = new T();
        p.foo = f;

        return p;
    }
    // Option 2: use the runtime type
    public static Parent createAnother2(Type t, bool f)
    {
        Parent p = Activator.CreateInstance(t) as Parent;
        p.foo = f;

        return p;
    }

    // Examples
    public static void Main()
    {
        Parent p1 = Parent.createAnother1<Child>(true);
        Parent p2 = Parent.createAnother2(typeof(Child), true);
    }
}
// the child class only has to worry about overriding Enter()
public class Child : Parent
{
    public override int Enter()
    {
        return 1;
    }
}

Note that you must instantiate objects through the createAnotherX because the default constructor is protected. In addition, as per your comment, see that the property is defined so that only you can set values, which is what you tried to do in your code when explicitly ignoring the setter.

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The problem is that I need to pass the parameters in the constructor, only there it can be Write, otherwise, it will be just read! –  EProgrammerNotFound Jan 8 '14 at 18:13
    
The generic type T also don't allow me to use the overloaded constructor T(this, Parameters); –  EProgrammerNotFound Jan 8 '14 at 18:31
    
@MatheusFreitas Looking at your code, seems that your constructors only assign/initialize fields, so there is no reason why you can't do that in the createAnotherX methods. Note that you can't just instantiate those classes elsewhere, it must be done through createAnotherX because the default constructor is protected. –  Julián Urbano Jan 8 '14 at 18:45
    
Ok, I will always create a new instance of Parent by using the static methods. Is this a good desing? –  EProgrammerNotFound Jan 8 '14 at 18:56
    
@MatheusFreitas no, you don't, you only need to initialize them in the createAnotherX methods. The default constructor does nothing. See the edited answer –  Julián Urbano Jan 8 '14 at 18:57

Is there a way to avoid this?

Short answer: Yes, when you define no constructor in your derived class, the (abstract) base class constructors are used. When you define one, you have to redefine all constructors.
Not without a workaround pattern.

EDIT: Sorry, I'm wrong that does only work for parameterless constructors.

How you can achive your goal,

is using a protected parameterless constructor and a static Create method:

public abstract class Duck {

    private string _DucksParam0;

    public string DucksParam0 {
        get {
            return  _DucksParam0;
        }
    }

    // Using protected, this constructor can only be used within the class instance
    // or a within a derived class, also in static methods
    protected Duck() { }

    public static DuckT Create<DuckT>(string param0)
        where DuckT : Duck
    {
        // Use the (implicit) parameterless constructor
        DuckT theDuck = (DuckT)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(DuckT));

        // This is now your "real" constructor
        theDuck._DucksParam0 = param0;

        return theDuck;
    }

}

public class Donald : Duck {
}

Usage (dotnetfiddle):

public class Program
{
    public void Main()
    {
        Duck d =  Duck.Create<Donald>("Hello  World");
        Console.WriteLine(d.DucksParam0);
    }
}
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Thank you, this is an good idea, I'll have to rethink the entire program. –  EProgrammerNotFound Jan 8 '14 at 18:38
    
I feel with you, that's a programmers life ;) make a backup/new branch, rework your base class and all the derived and then give it a shot. –  metadings Jan 8 '14 at 18:43

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