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Please consider the following:

class CMyClass
{
public:
  CMyClass()
  {
    printf( "Constructor\n" );
  }
  CMyClass( const CMyClass& )
  {
    printf( "Copy constructor\n" );
  }
};

int main()
{
  std::list<CMyClass> listMyClass;

  listMyClass.resize( 1 );

  return 0;
}

It produces the following output:

Constructor

Copy constructor

Now my question is: How do I avoid the copy constructor? Or to put it in another way: How can I create objects inside an STL container without the unnecessary copy operation. Is there some way to do an "in-place" construction using the default constructor?


Update - answers so far:

  1. It can't be done
  2. Use pointers or smart pointers instead.

Smart pointers are an overkill for my application. But I really wonder why this can't be done. It seems like such an obvious thing to want to do. Any other ideas? I will even accept a nasty hack if it works...


Solution

I think I just found a solution for my problem from all the comments and answers posed here. The solution is to construct an empty object and to keep it around for the sole purpose of using it later for making clean copies of. Then you can use one of the methods that take a reference (like push_back or insert). This still calls the copy constructor for every new object inserted, but at least it is not both the default constructor AND copy constructor:

int main()
{
  CMyClass Empty;

  std::list<CMyClass> listMyClass;

  for ( int c=0; c<10; ++c )
  {
    listMyClass.push_back( Empty );
  }

  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
It might seem an obvious thing, but from a functional point of view, it doesn't matter and several algorithms (sort, remove,...) also use copying, so be prepared to be copied ;) (See also devx.com/tips/Tip/13606) –  stefaanv Jan 20 '10 at 10:41
    
An obvious thing to do? Why is that? Why is copying a problem? –  jalf Jan 20 '10 at 11:11
    
Obvious? If you called mylist.resize(10), how would you expect to end up with ten distinct objects if they are not copies? –  visitor Jan 20 '10 at 11:26
    
All I want to do is to is to construct a new object inside a list. What STL does is to construct a temp object first and then copy the temp object using the copy constructor. This copy is an unnecessary waste of time. An alternative implementation of mylist.resize(10) could have called the default constructor 10 times. What it does instead is to call the default constructor once, followed by the copy constructor 10 times. This is a small overhead for 10 objects (10%), but if you have to add the objects one at a time, the overhead is double (100%). –  Barnett Jan 20 '10 at 11:45
    
Well, you may wish the standard container behaved like that, but they don't. In some cases, the call to the copy ctor may be elided by the compiler, but if you don't want to depend on it, why not use pointers, like everyone is suggesting? –  anon Jan 20 '10 at 12:01

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

By design, all the C++ Standard Library containers store copies. Therefore the call to the copy constructor cannot be avoided if you wish to store values in the container - the only way out is to store pointers instead. If you want to mitigate the overhead of copying, investigate the use of reference counting.

share|improve this answer

use pointers

std::list<CMyClass*> listMyClass;
share|improve this answer
2  
even better: use smart pointer, automatically creating/destroying the object in question –  user231967 Jan 20 '10 at 9:43
2  
Just not an auto_ptr. That will cause bad things to happen. –  Michael Anderson Jan 20 '10 at 11:19

Sorry, not currently with std::list and similar containers. (But you can write your own slightly-different container if you really need this, and still follow the rest of the STL interface.)

You don't have to use the default ctor, however:

std::list<CMyClass> listMyClass;
listMyClass.resize(1, obj_to_copy_from);

Such as:

std::list<CMyClass> listMyClass;
listMyClass.resize(1, CMyClass(use, specific, ctor));

Resize looks like:

void list<T>::resize(size_type new_size, T copy_from = T());

Which creates a new object (using the default ctor) by default.

share|improve this answer

It would be useful if vector allowed initializing new elements with default constructor on resize because of performance, but this is not supported. If you really need this, implement custom container - there is no other way.

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use a pointer or smart pointer (boost::shared_ptr and not auto_ptr)

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http://swagatata.tumblr.com/post/5896332725/vector-construction

Even if you do

std::list<classname> objectname(100);

the constructor would be called once and the 100 objects would be constructed using copy constructor.

share|improve this answer

you can do in c11, for older versions, vesry simple can be improved

vector

myclas: public vector<A>
{
    push_back(Aconstructor_parameters)
    {
       new(_Mylast++) A(Aconstructor_parameters);
    }
};

when using ensure that you have used reserve() to allocate the memory

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