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Some questions on GPS receiver module:

  1. If we purchase a USB GPS receiver module, do we have to pay monthly/time based charges for using the facility?

  2. Is it possible to use the data from a receiver to detect acceleration? Approximately, how much acceleration can we measure? Would the data transmission rate between the receiver and the laptop be a problem?

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closed as off topic by Neil Butterworth, YOU, Pascal Cuoq, Piskvor, jitter Jan 20 '10 at 11:46

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On the subject of the US turning GPS off (as mentioned in some answers), there are other reasons why it might not be available: guardian.co.uk/technology/2009/may/19/gps-close-to-breakdown –  Quentin Jan 20 '10 at 10:00
    
David: With the Galileo constilation coming online in the coming years, the issues surrounding GPS's "selectable deniability" is slowly being less of an issue. –  squeeks Jan 20 '10 at 10:08
    
Sure, your current reciever that is not GNSS enabled might fail, but there are so many new satellites augmenting the system that the technology will improve. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_navigation_satellite_system Just means buying a new receiver that deals with additional constellations. –  Shane MacLaughlin Jan 20 '10 at 10:11

5 Answers 5

  1. No. But the GPS network might go offline whenever, it's just provided as a niceness, there's no "service guarantee".
  2. Probably yes, but expect a rather coarse measurement.
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GPS is typically only free in its uncorrected state. You will either need two recievers to establish a differential or RTK pair, or purchase a subscription based correction service for decent accuracy. Good network RTK will give you quite accurate accelaration measurements when properly configured. –  Shane MacLaughlin Jan 20 '10 at 10:00

Simple (autonomous) GPS is free, and depending on the reciever will be accurate to about 10 meters. You can purchase various types of corrections to improve on this ranging from WAAS, DGPS to NRTK depending on the capability of your receiver and how much you want to pay. Sub-meter broadcast corrections via WAAS are available on many mid-range receievers, whereas you will require a survey grade reciever and RTK or NRTK corrections for centimeter accuracy. The accuracy of an acceleration signal is based on positional accuracy and how often your position is updated, see NMEA 0183 for data formats. Some corrections are better suited to moving observers, e.g. RTCA is designed for aircraft whereas RTCM is designed for marine use. On survey grade receivers you can typically configure the dynamics of the unit to be static, slowly moving or quickly moving to suit your application.

Edit: With regards to other comments about the Americans turning the signal off, this is highly unlikely, as the russians also have actively maintained sattelites out there (Glonass), and europe is putting more into space (Gallileo). Newer receievers, often dubbed GNSS and G3, combine corrections from all these constellations to improve accuracy and reliability.

Edit 2 Using autonomous GPS without any other sensors, time tends to be very accurate and position much less so, so a good way of getting velocity is to model the probable dynamics of your movement, and use that model for smoothing purposes. e.g. If you join the dots on raw GPS position you get a zig zag line, whereas if you are driving in a car you know that you are generally travelling in a reasonably straight line, and changes in acceleration are similarly smooth. Thus if you take your recent positions, and do a least squares line fit, arc fit, or similar curve fit through them, you get the most probable line travelled. You can use this line to get a better running average determination of velocity. If you have background mapping of a road, you can also use that for regression analysis and velocity prediction. If the average direction you are travelling is varying wildly in this scenario, and the position isn't changing much, chances are that your are static. In a ship or plane the dynamics are different, you might have much larger radii that you can possibly turn through, and can factor these into your analysis. If you are walking, you can zig zag all over the place, although you usually don't. For this reason, many hillwalking GPS units include a magnetic compass and correct for bearing.

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Q1:

After Korean Air Lines Flight 007 was shot down in 1983 after straying into the USSR's prohibited airspace, President Ronald Reagan issued a directive making GPS freely available for civilian use, once it was sufficiently developed, as a common good. The first satellite was launched in 1989, and the 24th and last satellite was launched in 1994.

Initially, the highest quality signal was reserved for military use, and the signal available for civilian use intentionally degraded ("Selective Availability", SA). Selective Availability was ended in 2000, improving the precision of civilian GPS from about 100m to about 20m.

Source: Wikipedia - History of Global Positioning System


Q2:

You can calculate acceleration from GPS data by finding the change in velocity (Δv) divided by the change in time (Δt). The accuracy of this will depend on the GPS receiver's ability to acquire very frequent position fixes. Most consumer-grade GPS receivers can only acquire a position every second, which will not be enough for accurate acceleration readings.

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Youe answer to Q2, while theoretically correct, wouldn't work with an autonomous consumer grade device, as the amount of random error is way too high. e.g. while standing still, you could be appear to be hopping about by 20m in random directions. You need to have some kind of model of probable dynamics to smooth the errors, which is what many in car receivers use. –  Shane MacLaughlin Jan 20 '10 at 11:30
    
@Shane, yes that might happen. There are techniques to filter that randomness in software, and there are also GPS receivers that try to filter it directly from the hardware. Some GPS tracking devices may even use an accelerometer or a vibration sensor to assist this filtering process. There is some info about this here: etenblog.com/2007/11/20/static-navigation-explained. However as you noted, all this filtering will make the acceleration calculation even more inaccurate. –  Daniel Vassallo Jan 20 '10 at 11:37
    
@ShaneMacLaughlin Daniel is totaly right, you are not: You can acuratly messearur the acceleration as he described. Positions are hopping, but not the speed value! Further you can set a threshold to avoid situation where GPS usually hops. This works fine! –  AlexWien Dec 6 '12 at 17:48
    
@AlexWein, my point was in relation to consumer grade GPS, which typically does not include much in the way of additional sensors. Higher end survey grade kit, and aeronautical kit often does, but there is a price penalty. Cheaper GPS (e.g. in-car, phone based etc...) also achieve higher apparent accuracy by smoothing and then snapping onto mapping features such as the nearest road edge within a given tolerance. Try recording a track of uncorrected GPS in an urban area if you don't believe me. It is very spiky. –  Shane MacLaughlin Dec 7 '12 at 7:37
    
@Daniel, I take your point, but if your receiver has an accelerometer on board, why use GPS to computer acceleration? Your typically talking navigation and GIS grade devices for these extra sensors, though that is starting to change. –  Shane MacLaughlin Dec 7 '12 at 7:42

No charge for use of the multi-billion dollar satellite network! Free information, well, timing signals!

You could use GPS data to measure acceleration if you are expecting large changes and measuring over an extended interval. The GPSr will compute speed, and you could compute acceleration between readings. But there is an inherent inaccuracy. First, the average accuracy for a GPSr might be 50 feet . At 65 miles per hour, you are doing 95 feet per second. See the problem? Second, the accuracy for a particular device changes with the terrain and weather (local and outer space). So you couldn't compute a stable adjustment factor.

No, the speed of your data transmission would not have a measurable effect on the computation, although you could compensate for that. The most interesting compensation, which is done inside your receiver, is made for the dilation of time caused by the high speed of the satellite. Einstein was right!

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1  
GPS receivers do actually measure velocity though, rather than taking position differences, so their velocity measurements are far better than you'd expect from the position errors. –  Andrew McGregor Jan 20 '10 at 10:25
    
The simplest test for what Andrew is referring to is to see how fast you are moving when you are standing still, using direct and calculated methods. If you are calculating manually, you will need to compute an average vector over at least three observations to have any hope of stability, which is what your receiver is doing in the background. –  Shane MacLaughlin Jan 20 '10 at 11:26
    
@Andrew: It would be kinda strange if the GPSr measured speed and integrated to determine position. That would mean position errors accumulate. With the device taking position readings, errors would affect average speed but that's not as important as position. How would a device get a starting position? I'm really curious about this - do you have a reference for that velocity claim? –  gary Jan 20 '10 at 22:38
    
@Shane: I have collected readings while standing still. The device shows random positions within a small radius. How could the device be registering changes in direction to record that? The compass in a GPRr depends on movement, –  gary Jan 20 '10 at 22:45
    
@Gary, depends very much on the device you use. I have a garmin GPS for hillwalking, and it includes a magnetic flux gate compass and altimeter. Combining the output from multiple sensors obviously improves results. Using pure GPS, time tends to be very accurate and position much less so, so a good way of getting velocity is to model the probable dynamics of your movement. I'll add some notes to my post to explain this better. –  Shane MacLaughlin Jan 21 '10 at 8:10

1: No, but you can't assume it will be available, GPS is not totally reliable. Apparently US policy is not to turn it off, but of course that can change.

2: You can, in so much as acceleration is the derivative of velocity, and GPS receivers are pretty good velocity measurement devices. But, even an avionics-grade GPS only gives you a sample at 5 Hz, most cheap ones only 1 Hz, so that's not very good acceleration measurement; it will tell you about very large accelerations sustained for a period of time.

Basically, if you want acceleration, get an accelerometer, it's the right thing.

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1) Agreed that GPS is not always that reliable, but it is constantly improving, and sattelite navigation goes way beyond the US at this stage. 2) A good survey grade receiver will give your 100hz updates if that's what you are after, but you are talking about something in the order of $30k. –  Shane MacLaughlin Jan 20 '10 at 10:08
    
Assuming GPS in code is a bad plan though; what say you're in a tunnel? That's more what I was talking about than the switch-off straw man. Mind posting some links to receivers that actually do receive GLONASS? I've never been able to find one (not that I've looked recently). –  Andrew McGregor Jan 20 '10 at 10:24
    
Here's a few I've been working with recently; leica-geosystems.com/en/GNSSGPS-Systems_4224.htm topcon.co.jp/en/positioning/atwork/feelit_hiper.html trimble.com/survey/GNSS-Surveying-Systems.aspx You'll often see this kit on road and rail building sites controlling the earth moving machinery –  Shane MacLaughlin Jan 20 '10 at 11:20

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