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I'm trying to do this in C++:

struct sagrup
{
    int imps;
    int clicks;
    int uclicks;
    int conversions;
    int * variable;
    unordered_map<int, struct sagrup> siguiente;
};

unordered_map<int, struct sagrup> agrupacion;

And I'm getting error: forward declaration of ‘struct sagrup’

I want to have that struct and add other struct into that ordered map so it will be like a tree.

Thanks to anyone that could help!

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marked as duplicate by Adam Rosenfield, Mark B, Fred Larson, Andrew Medico, P0W Jan 9 at 5:30

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have a couple issues:

First, you do not need to use struct everywhere. Second, are attempting to use an incomplete type with a template that requires a complete type definition (otherwise it doesn't know how to construct it). That map should be declared as a pointer, not another instance of sagrup.

The resulting code looks like this:

struct sagrup
{
    int imps;
    int clicks;
    int uclicks;
    int conversions;
    int * variable;
    unordered_map<int, sagrup*> siguiente;
};

unordered_map<int, sagrup> agrupacion;
share|improve this answer
    
There's not necessarily a never-ending construction chain here -- unordered_map<K, V> doesn't have to have a member of type V in it. –  Adam Rosenfield Jan 8 at 18:36
    
@AdamRosenfield That verbiage was fixed. –  Zac Howland Jan 8 at 18:37
    
The sentence "Second, you have a never ending construction chain with your siguiente member" is not necessarily true, depending on how unordered_map is implemented. std::shared_ptr<sagrup> can be instantiated just fine, even though sagrup is an incomplete type. There's no infinite construction chain in struct X { shared_ptr<X> p; }; because a shared_ptr doesn't have a member of type X, it has a member of type X*, so the construction of a shared_ptr<X> doesn't need to construct an X. –  Adam Rosenfield Jan 8 at 18:42
    
@AdamRosenfield Sorry, missed one of the sentences in my first edit. Fixed. Though, examples of shared_ptr do not apply to the OP's current problem. –  Zac Howland Jan 8 at 18:44
    
Thank you!, using sagrup* fixed the problem. =) Thanks –  user3174578 Jan 8 at 18:47

Before the type has been fully defined, the compiler does not know anything about the type; i.e. what members are and their sizes and its in complete

Forward declaration is used only for references and pointers to such a struct.

Alternatively you can use:

unordered_map<int, sagrup*> siguiente;

inside your struct

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Forward declarations can also be used for template parameters, only if the class allows it. For example, std::shared_ptr<> can be instantiated on an incomplete type, because the standard explicitly allows that. But std::unordered_map<> cannot be. –  Adam Rosenfield Jan 8 at 18:39
    
@AdamRosenfield shared_ptr and unique_ptr can use incomplete types because they don't really care about the type, but rather a pointer to the type. –  Zac Howland Jan 8 at 18:43
    
@ZacHowland: Right, that's why whether or not a template can be instantiated on an incomplete type depends on the particulars of the class's implementation. shared_ptr<> can be, unordered_map<> can't. –  Adam Rosenfield Jan 8 at 18:46

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