Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I write a simple project on shared memory in linux. Two programs share memory, one is writing letters to it and second is reading them from it. I decided to use semaphores in order to ensure that no new letter is produced until it is read.

The problem is that my writer process is ignoring sem_wait( reading ) when its value is 0 and it should wait. It finishes its job before the reader even starts. I run it through ./writer & ./reader.

I enclose the code. There are a few unused elements here because it is not the final version yet. However problem already arised.

/* writer.c */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/shm.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <semaphore.h>

int main( int argc, char *argv[] )
{
    key_t shmkey = 0xF00;
    int bytes = sizeof(char)*3 + sizeof(sem_t) * 3;
    int shmid;
    char* sharedMemory;
    sem_t *writing, *reading, *working;

    if ( (shmid = shmget( shmkey, bytes, IPC_CREAT | IPC_EXCL | 0666 )) < 0 )
    {
        shmdt( (void*) sharedMemory );
        shmctl( shmid, IPC_RMID, NULL );
        return 1;
    }
    if ( (sharedMemory = (char*) shmat( shmid, NULL, 0 )) == (char*) -1 )
    {
        shmdt( (void*) sharedMemory );
        shmctl( shmid, IPC_RMID, NULL );
        return 1;
    }

    writing = (sem_t*)(sharedMemory + 3);
    reading = writing + 1;
    working = reading + 1;

    sem_init( writing, 0, 0 );
    sem_init( reading, 0, 0 );

    sharedMemory[2] = 'w'; // writer is running
    char c;
    for( c = 'a'; c <= 'z'; ++c )
    {
        *sharedMemory = c;
        sem_post( writing );
        sem_wait( reading );
    }
    sharedMemory[2] = 'q';
    while ( sharedMemory[2] != 'w' );
    sharedMemory[2] = 'q';
    shmdt( (void*) sharedMemory );
    shmctl( shmid, IPC_RMID, NULL );
    return 0;
}

And the reader,

/* reader.c */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/shm.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <semaphore.h>

int main( int argc, char *argv[] )
{
    key_t shmkey = 0xF00;
    int bytes = sizeof(char)*3 + sizeof(sem_t) * 3;
    int shmid; 
    char* sharedMemory;
    sem_t *writing, *reading, *working;

    sleep(1); // wait until writer allocates fresh memory
    if ( (shmid = shmget( shmkey, bytes, 0666 )) < 0 )
    {
        shmdt( (void*) sharedMemory );
        return 1;
    }
    if ( (sharedMemory = (char*) shmat( shmid, NULL, 0 )) == (char*) -1 )
    {
        shmdt( (void*) sharedMemory );
        return 1;
    }

    if ( sharedMemory[2] != 'w' ) // is writer running?
    {
        shmdt( (void*) sharedMemory );
        return 1;
    }

    writing = (sem_t*)(sharedMemory + 3);
    reading = writing + 1;
    working = reading + 1;

    //sleep(5); //@REMOVE

    char c;
    do
    {
        sem_wait( writing );
        c = *sharedMemory;
        sem_post( reading );
        printf( "%c\n", c );
    } while ( sharedMemory[2] == 'w' ); 
    sharedMemory[2] = 'w';
    shmdt( (void*) sharedMemory );
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
The documentation says the second argument to sem_init() should be nonzero for the semaphore to be shared between processes - you would appear to be invoking undefined behaviour. What happens if you change that? –  Notlikethat Jan 9 at 2:24
    
@Notlikethat it does not help –  infoholic_anonymous Jan 9 at 2:30
    
Also you should be checking the return values - on failure reading errno will tell you what was wrong. –  Notlikethat Jan 9 at 2:32
    
@woolstar I didn't know that. I used semaphores before but without that procedure, without shared memory though. Could you give me a hint how the command should look like, i.e. what flags should I set and if destroy() is enough at the end of the code to free the it's memory? –  infoholic_anonymous Jan 9 at 2:32
    
Sorry, the style you are using is called unnamed semaphores which I was familiar with, but is essentially valid. –  woolstar Jan 9 at 2:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

sharedMemory + 3 is not properly aligned for type sem_t. Since you don't know the alignment requirement for sem_t, you need to make sure that your sem_t objects start at an offset in the shared memory segment that is a multiple of sizeof(sem_t) (this works because the alignment requirement of any object evenly divides its size).

Note that you should be checking the return values of sem_wait and sem_post. Then you could inspect errno if they fail and that would give you information on why they're failing (however in your case I suspect the errno value may have been less than helpful).

share|improve this answer
    
I was checking them. They were equal to 0. so it seems sem_init() works. –  infoholic_anonymous Jan 9 at 2:45
    
I don't get why should I check errno. Writer process ends and returns 0 so there shouldn't be any errors from the program point of view, am I correct? –  infoholic_anonymous Jan 9 at 2:47
    
I changed bytes = sizeof(sem_t)*4 which to my understanding creates the desired offset. It didn't help. –  infoholic_anonymous Jan 9 at 2:54
    
That's not the change I suggested. I said you should change the first 3 (the one multiplied by sizeof(char), which incidentally is an ugly way of writing 1) and the 3 in sharedMemory + 3, both to sizeof(sem_t). –  R.. Jan 9 at 3:20
    
As for checking for an error return and checking errno, it won't necessarily help find your error, because you're invoking undefined behavior. But in general, sem_post and sem_wait could fail (especially sem_wait can fail with EINTR when interrupted by a signal), so you should be checking their return values rather than assuming they succeeded. In your case, I suspect sem_wait is getting EINVAL or EFAULT or something from the kernel for passing an invalid (misaligned) address to wait on. –  R.. Jan 9 at 3:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.