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What is the difference between programming for embedded systems vs device drivers? Both areas deal with making the hardware do a specific task. I would appreciate an explanation. I have knowledge of C and i would like to go a bit deeper dealing with the hardware.

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closed as too broad by dwelch, Andrew Medico, Sankar Ganesh, Sergey, UncleO Jan 9 at 6:07

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Embedded system is an umbrella term, that covers device drivers. The opposite is not true. –  Aki Suihkonen Jan 9 at 5:27

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What is the difference between programming for embedded systems vs device drivers?

Writing a Device Driver means a very specific thing: writing low-level code that runs at elevated privilege in the kernel. It's quite tricky, but if your hardware is similar enough to existing hardware, you can sometimes "get by" by copying an existing driver and making a few changes. Writing a driver from scratch involves knowing the a lot about the kernel. Device Drivers are only written in C.

Writing for an "Embedded system" isn't very specific. Generally, it means "programming on a computer with fewer resources than a desktop PC, and maybe special hardware". There is no real line between "embedded computer" and "general purpose computer".

Everyone would agree that an 8-bit system with 128 bytes of RAM is "embedded programming" (Arduino). But the Rasberry PI (with GBs of RAM, hard drives, HDMI display) can be considered embedded or not depending on your view. If you unplug the monitor and put it on a robot, more people would say it requires embedded programming. People sometimes call programming apps for phones "embedded programming", but generally they call it "mobile" instead.

Embedded systems can be programmed in high level languages like Ruby/Python, or even shell scripts.

What are some purposes to programming device drivers

Well, any time you have a hardware device. These days, we have FUSE and USBLib, which blur the line. But if you want your wifi/webcam/usb port to be recognized by the OS, it needs a driver.

What cant you do programming wise for embedded systems that you can programming device drivers and vise versa?

As I said, embedded systems sometimes contain bash scripts (i.e. my home router).

I'm confused because they both deal with programming for hardware specifically on a low level.

There is some overlap, but they are quite distinct.

Embedded is an adjective that describes the whole system, while 'driver' refers to one specific tiny part of the system. You can do driver programming without doing embedded (i.e. writing a driver for a webcam on your desktop), and you can do embedded programming without writing new kernel drivers. (i.e. no need to write drivers if all your hardware is supported by the kernel.)

If i wanted to create a robot would this be under embedded systems or device drivers?

On-board robotic systems are usually embedded programming. It gets fuzzy if you strap a laptop to your robot -- people might say that's not embedded anymore, since it's a desktop OS. (Embedded systems rarely have a GUI, and if they do, it's rarely a mainstream one.)

Your robot may or may not require writing new drivers. Maybe the motor can be turned on from user space, so you don't need a driver. On the other hand, there are times where you need the extra features found only in the kernel: Faster response times, access control, etc. For example, if your program dies, it might leave the motor running, and that's bad. So you can write a kernel driver that will clean up for your program when the program exits. It's a little bit more work up front, but can make development simpler down the road.

What about making the GPU of a PC work for that O.S.? Would that be device drivers? If the hardware is stand alone without OSthen it is embedded?

Yes. Writing a GPU driver is writing kernel device driver code. (it's fuzzy these days because of libraries, but whatever.) If you wrote it on embedded hardware, you can call it both device driver and embedded programming.

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I'm still having a hard time making the distinction between the two. What are some purposes to programming device drivers versus programming for embedded systems? What cant you do programming wise for embedded systems that you can programming device drivers and vise versa? I'm confused because they both deal with programming for hardware specifically on a low level. If i wanted to create a robot would this be under embedded systems or device drivers? What about making the GPU of a PC work for that O.S.? Would that be device drivers? If the hardware is stand alone without OSthen it is embedded? –  user2644819 Jan 9 at 4:45

The way you have posed the question the answer is there is no difference. you have asked what is the difference between an apple and an apple? None.

Now if you are wanting to say compare bare metal and linux device drivers? Well the linux device drivers have a lot of operating system api calls you have to make and have to conform to that sandbox, so there is a lot of work there on top of the poking and peeking of registers and memory of the various peripherals. If you go bare metal (no operating system) then you can do pretty much anything you want, you can create more work for yourself than a (linux) device driver or you could create less work for yourself.

You can go to the depth of a device driver, or all the way to bare metal it is your choice. As far as the peripheral is concerned the stuff you have to do to it or with it will be similar, the differences will have to do with dealing with the operating system vs dealing without an operating system.

Maybe you should pick a task and do that, something like send a byte out a serial port is a reasonable statement. Putting a pixel on a display (raspberry pi is an exception), anything graphics, anything usb, is not a reasonable statement, there is a considerable amount of overhead and knowledge and experience you would need before doing that. Blinking an led (basic gpio) reading a button, and uart tx and rx are generally where you get your feet wet with bare metal. Granted tty/uart stuff on linux is far from beginner stuff so you really just have to start trying things and failing and get up and try something else and see where that takes you. fortunately there are tons of simulators out there so you can do all of these things using free everything, simulators, toolchains, etc.

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if your question is linux device drivers compared between non-embedded linux systems and embedded linux systems, the whole idea of linux makes that fairly invisible. Perhaps different peripherals, but be it applications or device drivers there should be little in the way of a difference in the experience. You could just use the computer you are reading this web page with... –  dwelch Jan 9 at 3:58

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