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What I took some time to work on is a program showing time elapsed, or time remaining, from where the user clicks the start button, much like a stopwatch or a chronometer which measures time until you stop and reset. Other examples of measuring time elapsed are those lap times in racing games and time limits, with milliseconds, in other games.

I'm running into some trouble, though, because my own stopwatch is not running at the same rate as actual time. It takes longer than one second for my timer to run one second down or up.

The code is right here: (the GUI works perfectly; I'm more concerned about how to control the values to show the time elapsed in a way that for every second passed, the time displayed on the JLabel is one second less. I cannot modify the argument that's passed into Thread.sleep because it will make the timer much worse.)

import javax.swing.*;

import java.awt.event.*;
import java.awt.*;
import java.text.DecimalFormat;
import java.util.concurrent.*;

public class StopwatchGUI3 extends JFrame 
{

    private static final long serialVersionUID = 3545053785228009472L;

    // GUI Components
    private JPanel panel;
    private JLabel timeLabel;

    private JPanel buttonPanel;
    private JButton startButton;
    private JButton resetButton;
    private JButton stopButton;

    // Properties of Program.
    private byte centiseconds = 0;
    private byte seconds = 30;
    private short minutes = 0;

    private Runnable timeTask;
    private Runnable incrementTimeTask;
    private Runnable setTimeTask;
    private DecimalFormat timeFormatter;
    private boolean timerIsRunning = true;

    private ExecutorService executor = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();

    public StopwatchGUI3()
    {
        panel = new JPanel();
        panel.setLayout(new BorderLayout());

        timeLabel = new JLabel();
        timeLabel.setFont(new Font("Consolas", Font.PLAIN, 13));
        timeLabel.setHorizontalAlignment(JLabel.CENTER);
        panel.add(timeLabel);


        buttonPanel = new JPanel();
        buttonPanel.setLayout(new FlowLayout(FlowLayout.CENTER));

        startButton = new JButton("Start");
        startButton.addActionListener(new ActionListener(){
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
            {
                if (!timerIsRunning)
                    timerIsRunning = true;

                executor.execute(timeTask);
            }
        });
        buttonPanel.add(startButton);

        resetButton = new JButton("Reset");
        resetButton.addActionListener(new ActionListener(){
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
            {
                timerIsRunning = false;

                centiseconds = 0;
                seconds = 30;
                minutes = 0;

                timeLabel.setText(timeFormatter.format(minutes) + ":" 
                        + timeFormatter.format(seconds) + "." 
                        + timeFormatter.format(centiseconds));
            }
        });

        buttonPanel.add(resetButton);

        stopButton = new JButton("Stop");
        stopButton.addActionListener(new ActionListener(){
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
            {
                timerIsRunning = false;
            }
        });

        buttonPanel.add(stopButton);


        panel.add(buttonPanel, BorderLayout.SOUTH);


        timeFormatter = new DecimalFormat("00");

        timeTask = new Runnable(){
            public void run()
            {
                while(timerIsRunning)
                {
                    executor.execute(incrementTimeTask);

                    try
                    {
                        Thread.sleep(10);
                    }
                    catch (InterruptedException ex)
                    {
                        ex.printStackTrace();
                    }
                 }
            }
        };

        incrementTimeTask = new Runnable(){
            public void run()
            {
                if (centiseconds > 0)
                    centiseconds--;
                else
                {
                    if (seconds == 0 && minutes == 0)
                        timerIsRunning = false;
                    else if (seconds > 0)
                    {
                        seconds--;
                        centiseconds = 99;
                    }
                    else if (minutes > 0)
                    {
                        minutes--;
                        seconds = 59;
                        centiseconds = 99;
                    }
                }

                executor.execute(setTimeTask);
            }
        };

        setTimeTask = new Runnable(){
            public void run()
            {
                timeLabel.setText(timeFormatter.format(minutes) + ":" 
                        + timeFormatter.format(seconds) + "." 
                        + timeFormatter.format(centiseconds));
            }
        };

        timeLabel.setText(timeFormatter.format(minutes) + ":" 
                + timeFormatter.format(seconds) + "." 
                + timeFormatter.format(centiseconds));

        add(panel);

        setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        setLocationRelativeTo(null);
        setTitle("StopwatchGUI.java");

        pack();
        setVisible(true);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        new StopwatchGUI3();
    }
}

There's gotta be another way to make the timer in sync with real time, just like a real stopwatch, instead of having to rely on three separate threads, which I think are too many for such a large programming project, but okay at entry level for now. (oh, by the way, the DecimalFormat class is to format the numbers properly like a real stopwatch, though there are no decimal values to round. It's only until now, at the time I posted this, that there exists a text class called SimpleDateFormat.)

In other words, I want this program to be just a real stopwatch. If this is not the case, then how do you create, or use, a stopwatch, in Java games, for example?

share|improve this question
2  
Try using a Swing Timer instead –  MadProgrammer Jan 9 at 5:03
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The biggest problem you would face is being able to get the various Runnables to run at a consistent rate. Basically, there's no real way to know when the Executor will actual execute the task you provide it, as it has it's own over heads.

In this particular case, I would recommend reducing the number of active Threads to one, this reduces any additional overheads involved in the creation and execution of other Threads and provides you with the best control over getting things to work as close to the time you want as possible.

Instead of using a Thread, I would instead, use a javax.swing.Timer, primary because it's simple and is executed within the context of the EDT which makes it safer to update the UI from within, for example

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.EventQueue;
import java.awt.FlowLayout;
import java.awt.Font;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import java.text.DecimalFormat;
import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JLabel;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.Timer;
import javax.swing.UIManager;
import javax.swing.UnsupportedLookAndFeelException;

public class StopwatchGUI3 extends JFrame {

    private static final long serialVersionUID = 3545053785228009472L;

    // GUI Components
    private JPanel panel;
    private JLabel timeLabel;

    private JPanel buttonPanel;
    private JButton startButton;
    private JButton resetButton;
    private JButton stopButton;

    // Properties of Program.
    private byte centiseconds = 0;
    private byte seconds = 30;
    private short minutes = 0;

    private DecimalFormat timeFormatter;

    private Timer timer;

    public StopwatchGUI3() {
        panel = new JPanel();
        panel.setLayout(new BorderLayout());

        timeLabel = new JLabel();
        timeLabel.setFont(new Font("Consolas", Font.PLAIN, 13));
        timeLabel.setHorizontalAlignment(JLabel.CENTER);
        panel.add(timeLabel);

        buttonPanel = new JPanel();
        buttonPanel.setLayout(new FlowLayout(FlowLayout.CENTER));

        startButton = new JButton("Start");
        startButton.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {

                timer.start();

            }
        });
        buttonPanel.add(startButton);

        resetButton = new JButton("Reset");
        resetButton.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {

                timer.stop();

                centiseconds = 0;
                seconds = 30;
                minutes = 0;

                timeLabel.setText(timeFormatter.format(minutes) + ":"
                        + timeFormatter.format(seconds) + "."
                        + timeFormatter.format(centiseconds));
            }
        });

        buttonPanel.add(resetButton);

        stopButton = new JButton("Stop");
        stopButton.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                timer.stop();
            }
        });

        buttonPanel.add(stopButton);

        panel.add(buttonPanel, BorderLayout.SOUTH);

        timeFormatter = new DecimalFormat("00");

        timer = new Timer(10, new ActionListener() {
            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                if (centiseconds > 0) {
                    centiseconds--;
                } else {
                    if (seconds == 0 && minutes == 0) {
                        timer.stop();
                    } else if (seconds > 0) {
                        seconds--;
                        centiseconds = 99;
                    } else if (minutes > 0) {
                        minutes--;
                        seconds = 59;
                        centiseconds = 99;
                    }
                }
                timeLabel.setText(timeFormatter.format(minutes) + ":"
                        + timeFormatter.format(seconds) + "."
                        + timeFormatter.format(centiseconds));
            }
        });

        timeLabel.setText(timeFormatter.format(minutes) + ":"
                + timeFormatter.format(seconds) + "."
                + timeFormatter.format(centiseconds));

        add(panel);

        setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        setLocationRelativeTo(null);
        setTitle("StopwatchGUI.java");

        pack();
        setVisible(true);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getSystemLookAndFeelClassName());
                } catch (ClassNotFoundException | InstantiationException | IllegalAccessException | UnsupportedLookAndFeelException ex) {
                }

                new StopwatchGUI3();
            }
        });
    }
}

I would also stop "guessing" at the time. There simply is no guarantee that the amount of time passed between "updates" is accurate.

Instead, I would grab the current time when the stop watch is started and on each tick of the Timer, subtract it from the current time, giving you the amount of time that has passed. You can then use that to determine what the current value of the stop watch should be...

For example...

Adding the following instance fields...

private long startTime;
private long runTime = 30000; // 30 seconds...

Updating the startButton to include capturing the start time...

startButton.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {

        startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
        timer.start();

    }
});

And then updating the Timer as follows...

timer = new Timer(10, new ActionListener() {
    @Override
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {

        long now = System.currentTimeMillis();
        long dif = now - startTime;
        if (dif >= runTime) {

            timer.stop();
            dif = runTime;

        }

        dif = runTime - dif;

        long minutes = dif / (60 * 1000);
        dif = Math.round(dif % (60 * 1000));
        long seconds = dif / 1000;
        dif = Math.round(dif % 1000);
        long centiseconds = dif / 10;

        timeLabel.setText(timeFormatter.format(minutes) + ":"
                + timeFormatter.format(seconds) + "."
                + timeFormatter.format(centiseconds));
    }
});

Take a look at Concurrency in Swing for more details

share|improve this answer
    
I feel a little bad about this, because I should have said in my original post that I do not want to use System.nanoTime() nor System.currentTimeMillis(). That's not how game programmers do it on video game consoles than the PC. (Of course I'm still curious if there is a way to update the time synchronously without using the System time methods. If there isn't, I'll just stick with this.) –  GregPDesJav Jan 9 at 15:58
    
The problem is, things like Timer and Thread.sleep only guarantee a minimum wait time, not an accurate wait time, so simply incrementing the time manually isn't going to give you the accuracy that you need. Hence the reason why I suggested that you reduce your work load down to the a single thread. And pretty much every "high resolution timer" I've seen has uses the internal clock. While there are issue with using System.currentTimeMillis and nanoTime is a better choice, it will be accurate then incrementing a single value...IMHO –  MadProgrammer Jan 9 at 20:24
    
Alright. I'll use the internal clock. But it's not in old consoles like the N64 or PlayStation. However, that's another story, unless you want me to bring it up as a separate question. –  GregPDesJav Jan 9 at 22:36
    
You have two issues with that statement. N64 and PS have almost direct access to hardware, so scheduling updates is probably already done against the internal hardware clock. Java, on a PC is considerably divorced from the hardware and is reliant on the OS's concept of time. N64 and PS are dedicated hardware machines, the PC isn't. You can't compare them like this. The best you can do is take the concept and apply to what you now have available...It would be like comparing a electric car with a T model Ford or the Kitty Hawk with a A380... –  MadProgrammer Jan 9 at 22:42
    
What programming languages are not divorced from the hardware? Is C++ included at all? (because my guess is that an example of a programming language directly connected to the hardware is assembly language. But isn't there any modern object-oriented languages too?) –  GregPDesJav Jan 9 at 23:38
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"There's gotta be another way to make the timer in sync with real time, just like a real stopwatch, instead of having to rely on three separate threads, which I think are too many for such a large programming project,"

You can just use a javax.swing.Timer. It's fairly easy to use. The basic constructor looks like this

Timer(int duration, ActionListener listener)

So what you could do is declare a Timer object as a class member. Then in the constructor, initialize it. Something like this

public Constructor() {
    timer = new Timer(1000, new ActionLisentener(){
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
            // do something
        }
    });
}

You can have a count that you increment in the timer. Also the timer has methods stop() start() and restart() you can use.

If you want a cleaner looking constructor, you could always create an inner listener class like

private class TimerListener implements ActionListener {
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
        // do something
    }
}

Then just initialize your timer like this

timer = new Timer(1000, new TimerListener());
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, that's for each second. I want the timer to update itself every 10 milliseconds. (sorry if my initial post wasn't clear enough. Trouble is, the delay time the algorithm needs to execute is always varied, and so I want to know how do game programmers do it.) –  GregPDesJav Jan 9 at 15:46
    
The duration in the timer can be changed dynamically during runtime. instead of a hard coded value, have a variable like delay. And when ever you want to change the delay, just update the delay variable. timer.setDelay(someInt) –  peeskillet Jan 9 at 15:53
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