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I have an authentication trait:

trait MyAuth {
  private def login(request: RequestHeader) = request.session get "email"

  private def onUnauthorised = Results.Redirect(routes.Session.add)

  def isAuthenticated(f: => String => Request[AnyContent] => Result) =
    Security.Authenticated(login, _ => onUnauthorised) { userEmail =>
      Action(request => f(userEmail)(request))
    }
}

I want to create a login-box -- partial view.

1) How do I check if an user is authenticated or not inside login-box? Something like that:

@if (userIsAuthenticated) {
  Hello @userName ! <a href="@routes.Session.destroy()">Logout</a>
} else {
  <a href="@routes.Session.add()">Login</a>
}

2) And in general, are there helpers in Play! similar to helper in Ruby on Rails -- functions I create myself and I can call in a view?

share|improve this question

1)

Any stateful info you use in templates you will have to pass in using a parameter. This seems inconvenient at first, but you quickly get used to it and it keeps templates nice and simple since you can always tell where behaviour is coming from.

Frequently-used request "context" info can conveniently be passed to templates (and from there to sub-templates) via implicit parameters. For instance, I do something like this:

// Class to contain custom request "context"
case class Context(email: Option[String])

// Your code...
trait MyAuth {
  private def login(request: RequestHeader) = request.session get "email"

  private def onUnauthorised = Results.Redirect(routes.Session.add)

  def isAuthenticated(f: => Context => Request[AnyContent] => Result) =
    Security.Authenticated(login, _ => onUnauthorised) { userEmail =>
      Action(request => f(Context(Some(userEmail)))(request))
    }
}

With a template with some implicit parameters like:

@()(implicit context: Context, request: RequestHeader, lang: Lang)

@context.email.map { email =>
  Hello @email ! <a href="@routes.Session.destroy()">Logout</a>
}.getOrElse {
  <a href="@routes.Session.add()">Login</a>
}

Then when using that in a controller:

def myAction = isAuthenticated { implicit context => implicit request =>
   Ok(views.html.myTemplate) // context added automatically
}

Note that you can also use WrappedRequest to encapsulate additional action data in composed actions.

The benefit of having your template context passed via implicit parameters is that while you have to specify them in the parameter list of each template, the compiler will add them automatically when calling the template function, i.e:

/* main.scala.html */
@(title: String)(content: Html)(implicit context: Context, request: RequestHeader, lang: Lang)

<html>
    <head><title>@title</title></head>
    <body>
        <div class="header">
            @context.email.map { email =>
                Hello: @email
            }.getOrElse {
                Please log in
            }
        </div>
        <div class="main">
            @content
        </div>
    </body>
</html>

And then call that from a top-level template:

/* mypage.scala.html 

   See how compiler adds implicit params when calling `main` template.
*/
@(title: String)(content: Html)(implicit context: Context, request: RequestHeader, lang: Lang)

@main("My Page") {
    <h1>Welcome to my page</h1>
}

2)

For general helper functions you can, for example, stick an object called Helpers inside the app.views package, i.e:

/* app/views/Helpers.scala  */
object Helpers {

   def prettyTime(time: DateTime): String = ...
}

Then call that in a view as @views.Helpers.prettyTime(dateTime), or import all helpers at the top of your template with @import views.Helpers._.

share|improve this answer
    
But I have a template "main" from which I call "login-box". According to your solution, I need to add (implicit context: Context, request: RequestHeader, lang: Lang) to each view which uses "main" as a template? It seems a lot of effort. I mean, each view has to pass the arguments for those 3 parameters. – Oskar K. Jan 9 '14 at 13:13
    
Yes, that's the case (but don't take my example too literally). As I said, it seems inconvenient at first but you quickly get used to it. Think of templates as pure functions - what comes out depends on nothing more than what goes in. Overall, combined with the fact that templates are type-safe and compiled, this makes them much less magical and thus easier to debug. Also note that nothing's stopping you from passing some "global config" object into your templates that provides these kind of helper methods. – Mikesname Jan 9 '14 at 13:16
    
Also note that because the parameters are implicit you don't (necessarily) have to explicitly pass arguments when calling those templates - the compiler does it for you. – Mikesname Jan 9 '14 at 13:22
    
Isn't there any way to call a scala custom function directly from a view? – Oskar K. Jan 9 '14 at 15:07
    
Sure there is (just import your class or call it directly.) But I thought we were talking here about things like isUserAuthenticated that depend on application state. If you want non-stateful view helper functions just stick them in a Helpers object or something in the views package and Bob's your uncle. – Mikesname Jan 9 '14 at 17:23

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