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I'll put here two examples where $stmt = $mysqli->prepare() + $stmt->bind_param() deny to work and I can't see for myself why. Not working:

if ($stmt = $mySQLi->prepare("DROP DATABASE ?")) {
        $stmt->bind_param('s', $db_name);
        $stmt->execute(); 
        $stmt->store_result();
}

Current working workaround:

 if ($stmt = $mySQLi->prepare("DROP DATABASE $db_name")) {
        //$stmt->bind_param('s', $db_name);
        $stmt->execute(); 
        $stmt->store_result();
 }

Not working:

if ($stmt = $strSQLi->prepare("SELECT ? FROM Strings.texts WHERE keyName = ? LIMIT 1")) {
        $stmt->bind_param('ss', strtolower($lang), strtolower("help_".$key));
        $stmt->execute();
        $stmt->store_result();
        $stmt->bind_result($result);
}

Current working workaround:

if ($stmt = $strSQLi->prepare("SELECT {strtolower($lang)} FROM EVEStrings.texts WHERE keyName = ? LIMIT 1")) {
        $stmt->bind_param('s', strtolower("help_".$key));
        $stmt->execute();
        $stmt->store_result();
        $stmt->bind_result($result);
}

Any idea WHY?

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you can not bind table name,table column name. You only can bind attributes values in binding. – Awlad Liton Jan 9 '14 at 9:51
up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is how mysqli::prepare() is working. It's completely written in the documentation.

http://php.net/manual/en/mysqli.prepare.php

Note:

The markers are legal only in certain places in SQL statements. For example, they are allowed in the VALUES() list of an INSERT statement (to specify column values for a row), or in a comparison with a column in a WHERE clause to specify a comparison value.

However, they are not allowed for identifiers (such as table or column names), in the select list that names the columns to be returned by a SELECT statement, or to specify both operands of a binary operator such as the = equal sign. The latter restriction is necessary because it would be impossible to determine the parameter type. It's not allowed to compare marker with NULL by ? IS NULL too. In general, parameters are legal only in Data Manipulation Language (DML) statements, and not in Data Definition Language (DDL) statements.

This part mostly: they are not allowed for identifiers (such as table or column names)

The idea of binding parameters it that you are sending to the database engine the query and in the runtine it binds the values you have given. If the table is not specified, the engine cannot build a valid statement, thus to continue executing the query and bind params is impossible.

I would not suggest to use dynamic table names in general, whether it is safe or not. However, if you really insist to do it, do not let the user to decide that. Decide the {strtolower($lang)} on application level (i.e. from an array), not from the user input.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not letting the user to put anything in query. $lang is result of another fetch from DB. But thank you for your answer! Very informative! Now I know. – user2997497 Jan 9 '14 at 9:59

As far as I know from PDO (and I think it's the same for mysqli) this can't be done.

bind_param and bind_value() can only bind values, not table or column names.

You have to filter your data manually, maybe with a whitelist method.

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