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I have that situation:

private Task LongRunningTask = /* Something */;

private void DoSomethingMore(Task previousTask) { }

public Task IndependentlyCancelableSuccessorTask(CancellationToken cancellationToken)
{
    return LongRunningTask.ContinueWith(DoSomethingMore, cancellationToken);
}

In particular, the behavior that interests me here is detailed in MSDN's page about Continuation Tasks in the following terms:

A continuation goes into the Canceled state in these scenarios:

The code above works. However, I am in the process of converting as many as possible of my continuations to using the await keyword.

Is there an equivalent using await that would allow the continuation to be canceled before the awaited task completes?

share|improve this question
    
Well, I'd simply check the cancellation token manually, that's what happens anyway. That is, if (!cancelled) await Task(); if (!cancelled) await Task2(); ... And of course, you can pass the token to the method as well (where it can also be handled any way you want). – Luaan Jan 9 '14 at 10:42
    
@Luaan: Your comment is conceptually the same as Francois Nel's answer, which does not resolve my question. – Jean Hominal Jan 9 '14 at 13:13
    
Are you sure that it works any differently when using ContinueWith? I thought that you can only cancel between tasks as well, and searching through Task source codes seems to support that - there's no way to cancel the task itself (unless you're handling the cancellation yourself inside the task), since it all depends on cooperative multi-tasking, not pre-emptive. At some point, the Task class simply launches your delegate, and it can't do anything until you return. Have you actually tried whether there is a difference between await and ContinueWith with cancellation? – Luaan Jan 9 '14 at 13:34
    
For example, you can await HttpClient with cancellation simply by doing await client.GetAsync(uri, cancellationToken);. So unless there's some hidden magic in the Action delegate itself (which is "implemented" outside of managed code, so I can't say for sure) or the ExecutionContext, you have to support cancellation "manually" inside your method - by having a cancellation token parameter which you use as usual. – Luaan Jan 9 '14 at 13:48
    
Also, don't forget that await and async use the same Task.ContinueWith method to do the continuations, so there's little reason to believe that it would work in a significantly different way. See also - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd997364.aspx and microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=19957 – Luaan Jan 9 '14 at 14:02
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The following should do it, albeit it looks a bit awkward:

private Task LongRunningTask = /* Something */;

private void DoSomethingMore() { }

public async Task IndependentlyCancelableSuccessorTask(
    CancellationToken cancellationToken)
{
    cancellationToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();

    var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();
    using (cancellationToken.Register(() => tcs.TrySetCanceled()))
        await Task.WhenAny(LongRunningTask, tcs.Task);

    cancellationToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
    DoSomethingMore();
}

[UPDATE] Following svick's suggestion, here it is shaped as a helper, based on Stephen Toub's Implementing Then with Await pattern:

public static class TaskExt
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Use: await LongRunningTask.Then(DoSomethingMore, cancellationToken)
    /// </summary>
    public static async Task Then(
        this Task antecedent, Action continuation, CancellationToken token)
    {
        await antecedent.When(token);
        continuation();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Use: await LongRunningTask.When(cancellationToken)
    /// </summary>
    public static async Task When(
        this Task antecedent, CancellationToken token)
    {
        token.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();

        var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<Empty>();
        using (token.Register(() => tcs.TrySetCanceled()))
            await Task.WhenAny(antecedent, tcs.Task);

        token.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
    }

    struct Empty { };
}

Perhaps, the first ThrowIfCancellationRequested() is redundant, but I haven't thoroughly considered all edge cases.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think you should somehow encapsulate this into a helper method. That way, the actual code won't look awkward. – svick Jan 9 '14 at 12:05
    
@svick, I've re-factored it as helper, is that something that you meant? – Noseratio Jan 9 '14 at 12:46
2  
@JeanHominal, no problem. Glad you you liked the concept, although apparently it would have taken quite a few more iterations for me to satisfy all of your requirements :) BTW, I do like struct Empty with TaskCompletionSource, it wasn't invited by me. – Noseratio Jan 9 '14 at 20:14
1  
@Noseratio: Also, now I think I understand the role of the Empty struct, that is, someone that receives the Task cannot cast it to Task<Empty> because Empty is not visible. – Jean Hominal Jan 10 '14 at 14:13
1  
@Noseratio, I've added an answer (that is an off-shoot of yours). I'd be interested to hear any comments you have, as I respect your judgement. – Matt Smith Oct 9 '14 at 15:41

While this answer is conceptually the same as Noseratio's, I am not satisfied by a few details of the implementation, and as such am publishing my proposed implementation of the helper so that it can be commented on by other people on this question.

public static async Task<TResult> WhenNotCanceled<TResult>(this Task<TResult> mainTask, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
{
    if (!cancellationToken.CanBeCanceled) {
        return await mainTask.ConfigureAwait(false);
    }

    cancellationToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();

    Task<TResult> completedTask;

    var cancellationTaskSource = new TaskCompletionSource<TResult>();
    using (cancellationToken.Register(() => cancellationTaskSource.TrySetCanceled(), useSynchronizationContext: false)
        completedTask = await Task.WhenAny(mainTask, cancellationTaskSource.Task).ConfigureAwait(false);

    cancellationToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
    return await completedTask.ConfigureAwait(false);
}

public static async Task WhenNotCanceled(this Task mainTask, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
{
    if (!cancellationToken.CanBeCanceled) {
        await mainTask.ConfigureAwait(false);
        return;
    }

    cancellationToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();

    Task completedTask;

    var cancellationTaskSource = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();
    using (cancellationToken.Register(() => cancellationTaskSource.TrySetCanceled(), useSynchronizationContext: false)
        completedTask = await Task.WhenAny(mainTask, cancellationTaskSource.Task).ConfigureAwait(false);

    cancellationToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
    await completedTask.ConfigureAwait(false);
}

Async pattern without cancel:

public async Task IndependentlyCancelableSuccessorTask()
{
    await LongRunningTask;
    DoSomethingMore();
}

Async pattern with cancel and WhenNotCanceled:

public async Task IndependentlyCancelableSuccessorTask(CancellationToken cancellationToken)
{
    await LongRunningTask.WhenNotCanceled(cancellationToken);
    DoSomethingMore();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
If you're concerned about capturing synchronization context, I'd suggest that you do using (cancellationToken.Register(() => cancellationTaskSource.TrySetCanceled(), useSynchronizationContext: false). – Noseratio Jan 9 '14 at 22:15
    
@Noseratio: Of course I am concerned about capturing the synchronization context - for me, the Task returned from a function must be able to be waited synchronously as well as asynchronously - and if it is waited synchronously, then it is actually the caller's synchronization context that gets captured, which can easily trigger a deadlock if running on the UI thread. Besides, getting back to the synchronization context does have a cost, and why pay it when you don't need to? – Jean Hominal Jan 10 '14 at 6:48
    
One more point about your code: it may expose the internal TaskCompletionSource.Task to the outer caller. It's available on Exception when await completedTask throws (if cancelled). IMO, it should remain private to the pattern. Also, I believe the second await completedTask is redundant, as discussed in the comments to my answer. That was a job for token.ThrowIfCancellationRequested() in my version. So, I take liberty to down-vote this. – Noseratio Jan 10 '14 at 9:23
    
@Noseratio: I guess you are right, that the cancellation task should not be leaked outside. Did an edit with that modification, and added the targeted usage pattern, that is, I want to have the same behavior as await, where the faults and cancellation inside of the main task are propagated outside. – Jean Hominal Jan 10 '14 at 9:54
    
If that's your goal, then the code does what it's meant to do. The boss calls the shots, +1 :) – Noseratio Jan 10 '14 at 10:15

My answer is only slightly different than @Jean Hominal's answer and incorporates @Noseratio's approach as well:

public static class TaskExtensionMethods
{
    public static Task<TResult> OrWhenCancelled<TResult>(this Task<TResult> mainTask, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        if (!cancellationToken.CanBeCanceled)
            return mainTask;

        return OrWhenCancelled_(mainTask, cancellationToken);
    }

    private static async Task<TResult> OrWhenCancelled_<TResult>(this Task<TResult> mainTask, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        Task cancellationTask = Task.Delay(Timeout.Infinite, cancellationToken);
        await Task.WhenAny(mainTask, cancellationTask).ConfigureAwait(false);

        cancellationToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
        return await mainTask;
    }

    public static Task OrWhenCancelled(this Task mainTask, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        if (!cancellationToken.CanBeCanceled)
            return mainTask;

        return OrWhenCancelled_(mainTask, cancellationToken);
    }

    private static async Task OrWhenCancelled_(this Task mainTask, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        Task cancellationTask = Task.Delay(Timeout.Infinite, cancellationToken);
        await Task.WhenAny(mainTask, cancellationTask).ConfigureAwait(false);
        cancellationToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
        await mainTask;
    }
}

Discussion:

  • All of the solutions (including this one), do not correctly handle the case where the original ContinueWith specified a TaskScheduler. Specifically, consider a TaskScheduler created TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext for usage in UI scenarios. In that case, with the original ContinueWith approach you were guaranteed that the cancellation token was checked prior to running the delegate but after already getting on to Main thread (see this answer). That is, the old approach has the nice effect of checking the Cancellation token "one last time" on the main thread prior to considering the result of the task (i.e. trumping whether the main task finished or faulted). This means that in addition to using these extension methods, the new code must wrap its await in a try/finally to do its final check of the CancellationToken :(. See this question.

  • @Noseratio's solution could handle the above issue (if needed), but it has the downside of requiring that continuation be placed into a delegate. In my opinion, this defeats one of the big advantages of converting to using await: the code doesn't end up in a delegate, it is just after an await and reads like normal sequential code.

Notes:

  • I wish I could have specified that the empty lambda never runs (i.e. instead of only running on cancellation), but the .ContinueWith method doesn't allow that. So, I (mostly arbitrarily chose OnlyOnCancelled)
share|improve this answer
1  
Hi Matt, I might have more thoughs later, so far one thing. Do you think Task cancellationTask = mainTask.ContinueWith(t => { }, cancellationToken, TaskContinuationOptions.ExecuteSynchronously | TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnCanceled, TaskScheduler.Default); can simply be replaced with Task.Delay(Timeout.Infinite, cancellationToken)? The latter is implemented quite efficiently by CLR. – Noseratio Oct 9 '14 at 21:07
1  
@Noseratio, I tried out the Task.Delay approach, and it works great. I find that much more readable than all the approaches thus far. Edited my answer. Thanks! – Matt Smith Oct 9 '14 at 21:59
1  
Matt, if mainTask will always be completed, why use mainTask.ConfigureAwait(false) at all? :) I agree about LazyCancellation but now I feel we're all reinventing the wheel here, as Stephen Toub did it already :) "How do I cancel non-cancelable async operations?" – Noseratio Oct 9 '14 at 22:03
1  
@Noseratio, Ah, yes, the ConfigureAwait(false) is superfluous (I'll edit and remove). And yes I wasn't aware of that article. The only behavioral difference between his approach and our approach is that in the case of the task completing and the cancellation token completing around the same time, our solution prefers to honor the cancellation. I somewhat still like the readability of the Task.Delay better. And I really wish there had been a ConfigureAwait that took a CancellationToken as it would have made conversion of this type of code have an exact equivalent. – Matt Smith Oct 9 '14 at 23:56
1  
@Noseratio, look at this version of WithCancellation: stackoverflow.com/a/26305788/495262 – Matt Smith Oct 10 '14 at 18:53

This answer comes from @Servy from this answer (with modifications):

public static Task WithCancellation(this Task task,
CancellationToken token)
{
    return task.ContinueWith(t => t.GetAwaiter().GetResult(), token, TaskContinuationOptions.ExecuteSynchronously, TaskScheduler.Default);
}

public static Task<T> WithCancellation<T>(this Task<T> task,
CancellationToken token)
{
    return task.ContinueWith(t => t.GetAwaiter().GetResult(), token, TaskContinuationOptions.ExecuteSynchronously, TaskScheduler.Default);
}
share|improve this answer

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