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I have this method that I want to use to return an Object that i have created by passing in the type name:

public object GetObjectType(object objectTypeName)
{
    Type objecType = objectTypeName.GetType();
    return Activator.CreateInstance(objecType);
}

When I do this:

var a =  GetObjectType("Person");

I get: No parameterless constructor defined for this object.

Im not too sure what this CreateInstance does so im flying blind here. Do I need to add something to my class which looks like this:

public class Person
{
    public string Name {get; set;}
}
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3  
Is that the entire Person class, exactly as you have defined it? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jan 9 '14 at 11:13
2  
The error seems pretty clear, what constructors have been defined on Person? –  David Jan 9 '14 at 11:14
    
You probably have a constructor with parameters, in which case the default parameterless constructor is not auto implemented. –  Florian F. Jan 9 '14 at 11:14
    
There are no methods an I just used person as an example because my actual classes hold alot of properties –  Mike Barnes Jan 9 '14 at 11:14
    
Well, there is a constructor there, either it is nonpublic, or it has parameters. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jan 9 '14 at 11:16

4 Answers 4

In fact you are trying to create new instance of String type, which indeed does not have a parameterless contructor.

public object GetObjectType(object objectTypeName)
{
    Type objecType = objectTypeName.GetType(); // objecType is String here
    return Activator.CreateInstance(objecType); // creation of String fails
}

What you might really want to do is this:

public object GetObjectType(string objectTypeName)
{
    Type objecType = Type.GetType(objectTypeName);
    return Activator.CreateInstance(objecType);
}
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Type objecType = Type.GetType(objectTypeName); gives null? –  Mike Barnes Jan 9 '14 at 11:28
    
@MikeBarnes, that is a different story - you might need a fully qualified name (if in different namespace), or an assembly (if in different assembly). Check out this thread for more options, something make me think that second answer migth be your best bet. At least now you have the error while creating the actual type you need. –  Andrei Jan 9 '14 at 11:30
    
ok cool thanks, very helpful –  Mike Barnes Jan 9 '14 at 11:32
    
@Andrei, your solution won't compile, because Type.GetType(typeName) needs a string as parameter, not an object. –  abto Jan 9 '14 at 11:37
    
@abto, you are right, sorry, missed that first time. Can you please make the edit again? –  Andrei Jan 9 '14 at 11:43

Try to add a parameterless constructor:

public class Person
{
    public string Name {get; set;}

    public Person() {} // Parameterless constructor
}
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It might be worth noting why Activator.CreateInstance might need a parameterless constructor. –  Timothy Groote Jan 9 '14 at 11:18
7  
FYI - Just tested it, you don't need to explicitly have a parameterless constructor unless you also have a parameterized one. Having no constructor counts as having a paramless one. –  Obsidian Phoenix Jan 9 '14 at 11:19

It seems that your are trying to create object without passing arguments to available parameterised constructor u have. Try this:

public object GetObjectType(object objectTypeName)
{
    Type objecType = objectTypeName.GetType();
    //ur code works fine if do not have parameterised constructor
    return Activator.CreateInstance(objecType,"(do not forget to pass arguments)");
}
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1  
This would lead to an instance of type string with "(do not forget to pass arguments)". –  abto Jan 9 '14 at 11:54
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is how I have solved the problem:

Type objectType = Type.GetType("MyProject.Models.Person", true);
Object objectTypeInstance = (Activator.CreateInstance(objectType));

I can now retrieve my objects

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