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I am preparing my economy-model for my game. I'm using soomla framework and just can't figure out what is the difference between this two entities.

I want to allow user to buy a new level. I think this should be a non consumable item managed by AppStore in order to allow user to restore transactions.

In the docs of CCLifetimeVG you can read:

Example usage: 'No Ads', 'Double Coins'

And in the docs of CCNonConsumableItem:

Don't be confused... this is not a CCLifetimeVG. It's just a MANAGED item in Google Play or iTnes. This item will be retrieved when you "restoreTransactions". Soomla creates its own mechanisms to preserve CCLifetimeVGs for you.

So I'm little bit confused about which model should I use and also what are this Soomla own mechanisms to preserve the purchases.

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you can use soomla and it gave example about Inapp purchage –  Singhak Jan 9 at 12:37
    
Indeed CCNonConsumableItem and CCLifeTimeVG are soomla classes and the question is tagged as soomla... Will edit the question. –  RubenVot Jan 9 at 16:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

CCLifetimeVG and CCNonConsumableItem play a similar part logically BUT CCLifetimeVG is handled by SOOMLA and enforced by the SOOMLA data model while CCNonConsumableItem is enforced by itunes/Google Play.

You can use both for the same purpose but only CCNonConsumableItem will be enforces by itunes/Google Play.

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Does it mean that CCLifeTimeVG should work against Soomla frontstore? What happens when the user tries to restore purchases in a CCLifetimeVG. –  RubenVot Jan 11 at 18:19
    
Yes and CCLifetimeVG is not being restored through 'restore purchases' but through the SOOMLA Highway. –  refaelos Jan 12 at 12:24
    
Great! I got it now :-) –  RubenVot Jan 13 at 9:09

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