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I have this Perl code:

@str = qw(a1 a2 a3);
my @array;
$s1 = 'a1';
$s2 = 'a2';
$s3 = 'a3';

Now given s1, s2, s3 get references to $array[0], $array[1], $array[2] respectively. A switch case is possible. but how to get it in one or two statements.

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Could you please clarify what you're going to achieve? –  Igor Korkhov Jan 20 '10 at 14:21
1  
Why? You already have values 'a1', 'a2', 'a3' so why do you need the values of out the array? Maybe is $s1 $s2 and $s3 corresponded to array indexes instead of values... Consider perhaps using a hash... ? –  Richard JP Le Guen Jan 20 '10 at 14:22
3  
@iamrohitbanga I think it is time for you take a break from posting and actually study Perl a little. I understand you are trying to get us to write what ever you need to write piece by piece and, of course, there is nothing wrong with that per SO's mission but your method will not help you learn anything. –  Sinan Ünür Jan 20 '10 at 15:14
2  
@iarohitbanga: we understand that you're working on a college project and have other things to do. However, it's rude to expect us to do your work for you. We are also working and and have other things that we could do, but we are the sort who like to help. You are abusing our kindness though. –  brian d foy Jan 20 '10 at 16:10
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@iarohitbanga Isn't the purpose of doing a college project on Perl to learn Perl? –  Sinan Ünür Jan 20 '10 at 17:14
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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

What you really want is a hash, not an array.

my %hash = (a1 => 'val 1', a2 => 'val 2', a3 => 'val 3');
my $s1 = 'a2'; # you want to read this from a file?
$hash{$s1} = 'new val 2';

Now, if you still want to use an array for the index names and a different array for its values, well, it's up to you, but you are using the wrong tool for the job.

use strict;
my @str = qw(a1 a2 a3);
my @array;

sub search_ref {
    my $s = shift;
    my $i = 0;
    foreach (@str) {
        if ($_ eq $s) {
            return \$array[$i];
        }
        $i++;
    }
    return undef;
}

my $ref = search_ref('a2');
$$ref = 'new val 2';
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+1 for answering the question and also filling the need. –  Alex Feinman Jan 20 '10 at 15:15
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Your question is a little unclear, but I think you're asking how to find the index of an element in an array.

You can do that by using grep over a list of the array indexes:

my ( $idx ) = grep { $str[$_] eq 'a1' } ( 0 .. $#str );

You can achieve the same thing with a slightly nicer syntax using the List::MoreUtils module.

use List::MoreUtils 'firstidx';
my $idx = firstidx { $_ eq 'a1' } @str;
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