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I'm trying to create a dynamic set abstract data type, based on a dynamic array. However, I get a compiler warning and an error when I try to add the data to the array, which are:

warning: dereferencing 'void *' pointer [enabled by default]

error: invalid use of void expression

My code is as follows, I've marked the problematic line with a comment

struct SET 
{
//general dynamic array
void *data;
int elements; //number of elements
int allocated; // size of array
};

struct SET create()
{
//create a new empty set

struct SET s;
s.data = NULL;
s.elements = 0;
s.allocated = 0;  //allocations will be made when items are added to the set    
puts("Set created\n");
return s;
}

struct SET add(struct SET s, void *item)
{
//add item to set s

if(is_element_of(item, s) == 0) //only do this if element is not in set
{
    if(s.elements == s.allocated)  //check whether the array needs to be expanded
    {   
        s.allocated = 1 + (s.allocated * 2);  //if out of space, double allocations
        void *temp = realloc(s.data, (s.allocated * sizeof(s))); //reallocate memory according to size of the set

        if(!temp) //if temp is null 
        {
            fprintf(stderr, "ERROR: Couldn't realloc memory!\n");
            return s;
        }

        s.data = temp;
    }

    s.data[s.elements] = item;   //the error is here
    s.elements = s.elements + 1;
    puts("Item added to set\n");

    return s;
}

else
{
    fprintf(stdout, "Element is already in set, not added\n");
    return s;
}
}

I've done research on void pointers, but clearly I'm missing something here. I'd appreciate any help I can get. Thanks for reading and hopefully answering!

share|improve this question
    
you should put all the function definition here.. it seem the member data should be void** ? –  michaeltang Jan 9 at 12:04
    
Why would that be? –  Matt Grima Jan 9 at 12:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

First, I think what you intend to have in your structure is an array of generic pointers (array of void *), because your items are void *, and you want to store them as an array. That is, you want a dynamic array of void *, thus, you should use void **:

struct SET {
    void **data;
    int elements;
    int allocated;
};

Of course, your add function needs to be updated:

struct SET add(struct SET s, void *item) {    
        if (is_element_of(item, s) == 0) {
            if (s.elements == s.allocated) {   
                s.allocated = 1 + (s.allocated * 2);
                void **temp = realloc(s.data, (s.allocated * sizeof(*s.data)));
                if (!temp) {
                    fprintf(stderr, "ERROR: Couldn't realloc memory!\n");
                    return s;
                }

            s.data = temp;
        }
        s.data[s.elements] = item;
        s.elements = s.elements + 1;
        puts("Item added to set\n");
        return s;
    }

    else {
        fprintf(stdout, "Element is already in set, not added\n");
        return s;
    }
}

Note the realloc line was changed: you don't want to realloc to s.allocated * sizeof(s), you want s.allocated*sizeof(*s.data), since you'll be storing elements of type void * (the type of *s.data is void *, I didn't explicitly write void * to make it easier to accomodate possible future changes).

Also, I believe you should change your functions to receive and return pointers to struct SET, otherwise, you will always be copying around the structure (remember that values are passed by copy).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much! –  Matt Grima Jan 9 at 12:17
2  
@MattGrima You're welcome. The idea behind dynamic arrays is always the same. When you want to store elements of type T in a dynamic array, then you must declare a pointer-to-T. In this case, you wanted to store void * in a dynamic array, so you need a pointer to void *, that is, void **. If you follow this line of thought, you will never make this mistake again :) –  Filipe Gonçalves Jan 9 at 12:21
    
Bear in mind, though, that when you pop out those elements from the set, the function receiving them must know their type if you want to dereference the pointer. –  Filipe Gonçalves Jan 9 at 12:22

You need to cast the void * pointer before dereferencing it.

((some_type *)(s.data))[s.elements] = *(some_type *)item;

share|improve this answer
    
I've cast it to char *, and it compiles, however I'm slightly worried that this defeats the purpose of the array. If it works like this, then why not have the array defined for strings to begin with? –  Matt Grima Jan 9 at 12:12

You are trying to use data as an array, but have declared it as void *. The compiler is not able to figure out if you intend to store the type of data into this array.

If you know what kind of data you are going to store in 'data', you should probably declare a type for it. (like char *data or int *data)

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure I follow.. The idea behind the array is that it can store data of any type. –  Matt Grima Jan 9 at 12:04
    
Then you need to cast it appropriately based on the type of data you are storing in it. –  Kiran Jan 9 at 12:08

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