Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

Hello Python/iPython users.

I have found a weird behavior of python using numpy arrays. I found a solution to the problem myself, but I'd love to get an explanation. Thanks in advance.

Here's the problem: Using ipython I create an numpy array a and a copy of a, called b:

import numpy as np
a=np.zeros(5)
b=a

However, b seems to be rather the identity of a and not a copy since changing b changes a as well.

b[0]=1
a
array([ 1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.])

The solution is to use b=a.copy() rather than b=a, but I'd like to understand why this is the case in python. I'm quite familiar with Matlab,R and Fortran and never ran into a problem like this before. Why would someone want to have a second name for the same data instead of a copy of this vector? Just some python-specific syntax thing or is there more to understand?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by falsetru, jonrsharpe, alko, tcaswell, isedev Mar 7 at 0:37

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
If you want to really understand what is happening here, read Facts and myths about Python names and values by Ned Batchelder. –  Tim Pietzcker Jan 9 at 12:22
add comment

2 Answers 2

Its simply a convention of python. All assignments never do anything but create a new handle to an existing object. That's a pretty sensible rule, because it keeps the semantics simple and transparent; in other languages, you may often be left wondering if you are modifying an existing object, or creating a handle to a new one. If you want to do something other than slapping a new name on an existing object, python always forces you to make that explicit. And as to why you would want to do that: try and find any piece of python code, and see how many assignment statements it contains. Apparently there is a use for it ;).

share|improve this answer
    
To expand on what the fundamental use of assignments in python is; assignment statements are always really nothing but a convenience. You could go entirely without them. Why give aliases to objects, when you can simply substitutes the expression that generates that object at the point where you need it? Cut out the middle man! Give it a try, and see how it works out. In a similar vein: you could go entirely without anything but brainfuck; turing completeness and all. But that does not necessarily make it a good idea. –  Eelco Hoogendoorn Jan 9 at 13:47
add comment

This is indeed a particularity of some objects in python. numpy arrays are actually derivated from the python "list" object which acts the same way.

Actually, when you create a list in python (or a numpy array), the data is stored at a given location in memory. An identification number is associated to this location and you can see it using the function "id"

a = [1, 2, 3]
print id(a)

If you type "b = a", b will point toward the same memory location as a. Therefore a and b will have the same identification number.

a = [1, 2, 3]
print id(a)
b = a
print id(b)

You must be very carefull about this because any modification on a will affects b also. The "copy" method will create a deep copy of a, meaning that b is stored into a new memory location

a = numpy.array([1, 2, 3])
print id(a)
b = a
print id(b)
c = a.copy()
print id(c)

there is now equivalent of "copy" for lists, instead you must use the ":" notation

a = [1, 2, 3]
print id(a)
b = a 
print id(b) #a and b are the same
c = a[:]
print id(c) #c is a deep copy of a
share|improve this answer
    
Your very last comment c is a deep copy of a is wrong: c is only a shallow copy (so any sublists are the originals not copies). If you want a deep copy use from copy import deepcopy then c = deepcopy(a). There are a variety of ways to copy lists: c = list(a) makes a shallow copy that is always a list but works on any sequence including generators, c = a[:] makes a shallow copy that is the same type as the original (e.g. could be tuple or str) but only works on sliceable sequences, and support functions copy.copy and copy.deepcopy. –  Duncan Jan 9 at 12:38
    
Additionally, numpy arrays do not derive from Python lists. ndarray.copy() also does not create a deep copy. –  Robert Kern Jan 9 at 13:37
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.