Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am experiencing some strange thing related with case classes and override protected val.

Let's say trait T have a protected def (or val).

trait T {
  protected def s: String
  def print(): Unit = println(s)
}

I can override this method def s with val s. There's no problem.

class A(override val s: String) extends T

OK. It compiles. But this makes s public since there is no protected keyword.

class B extends T {
  override protected val s: String = "Show me the money"
}

OK. It compiles. (s of class B is protected)

class C(override protected val s: String) extends T

OK. It compiles. (s of class C is protected) Let's do these with case class.

case class D(override val s: String) extends T

OK. It compiles. (although s of class D is public)

case class E() extends T {
  override protected val s: String = "Show me the money"
}

OK. It compiles. (s of class E is protected)

case class F(protected val s: String) extends T

OK. It compiles. (s of class F is protected, and also s is overriden as it was not concrete in trait T. It was abstract, so override keyword is not necessary.)

case class G(override protected val s: String) extends T

Here, compile error appears. error: value s$1 overrides nothing

Basically, class F and class G are the same. class F overrides s and s is protected. This can be shown by that F("Something").print() will indeed print Something. override protected val can be used in case class as class E shows. It did not make errors in defining normal class C.

However, only defining class G results in a compile error.

Why does this thing happen?

I'm using Scala 2.10.3

share|improve this question
    
Seems to be a bug. Please report it here. –  sschaef Jan 9 '14 at 14:41
    
@sschaef OK. I'll report. –  Naetmul Jan 9 '14 at 14:43
1  
definietly a bug. Because s is protected, scala generates a separate syntetic <caseaccessor> def s$1 public method that returns s so that companion object of G can have access to it, for example. Both are marked override even though s$1 overrides nothing. –  gourlaysama Jan 9 '14 at 14:58
1  
also, a protected val parameter for a case class isn't really of any use: you can get the val's value without being a subclass using the extractor. So s might just as well be public. –  gourlaysama Jan 9 '14 at 15:21
    
Submitted: issues.scala-lang.org/browse/SI-8132 –  Naetmul Jan 9 '14 at 15:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This bug will be fixed in Scala 2.11.0-M8

https://issues.scala-lang.org/browse/SI-8132

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.