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So I believe all you have to do with .NET 2.0 vanilla web services (not WCF) is the following:

1) Add your service reference. In my case I'm using the PayPal WSDL 2) Before you can use any proxy class, you must first create an instance of your service reference 3) Once you create an instance of your service reference, then just do [servicereference].ProxyClassName.Method or whatever you're trying to access from those classes

right?

Ok, so I tried that. I added a service reference and named it SandboxSoapAPI. So that's what you see under references in my C# project.

In code I tried this:

SandboxSoapApi reference = new SandboxSoapApi();

but it doesn't recognize SandboxSoapAPI. Am I doing something wrong? I just want to start calling class methods, etc. with PayPal and I can't seem to get this right.

And if I'm not incorrect, as of .NET 2.0+ it handles the low level sending of the actual request over Http for SOAP web service references?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

SandboxSoapAPI is not the SOAP client proxy type name. It's a namespace.

To check this, in VS.NET tick 'show all files' and drill into the Web References, open up the Reference.cs file, you will see the SandboxSoapApi is a subnamespace (not your SOAP client proxy name!) in the project's root namespace.

So either use the fully qualified name:

SandboxSoapAPI.YourProxyType client = new SanboxSoapAPI.YourProxyType();

Or use using SandboxSoapAPI; in your code where you need the SOAP client.

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thanks. So I do see [projectnamespace].WebServiceReferenceName in that Reference.cs and I do have a using [projectnamespace].WebServiceReferenceName in my C# class where I'm trying to create that instance. The message I get when hovering over SandboxSoapApi is "Type name expected but namespace name found" –  MSSucks Jan 20 '10 at 14:56
    
Yes, see my edit. –  Wim Hollebrandse Jan 20 '10 at 14:57
    
Ah thanks. I did not know that there is an additional proxyType for the client. I thought that the reference itself was an object. –  MSSucks Jan 20 '10 at 15:02
    
You helped me a ton. I didn't infer all that even though yes I could have looked at the Reference.cs I still wouldn't infer to just go look for some client proxy class in the service. I wish there was better docs on .NET 2.0+ web services..without so much jargon. They use stuff like asynchronous calls..ok well I did not know that it's also inferred that under the covers it does all the low-level building of the request. –  MSSucks Jan 20 '10 at 15:12
    
Additionally, and likely of interest, is that under the hood, the 'Add Web Reference' functionality in VS.NET simply wraps the wsdl.exe command line utility which generates the proxy client and data types. You can equally add the generated .cs file manually to your project if you so wished. You may want to play around with wsdl.exe a bit. It will broaden your understanding of what goes on. Cheers! –  Wim Hollebrandse Jan 20 '10 at 15:19

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