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so im trying to define a generic ADT. i have a struct that looks like this:

struct grid_type{
    void* table;
    int startX, startY, endX, endY, xDim, yDim;
};

as you can see i have a void pointer which should be able to store various data types. for this instance im trying to point to an int** (two dimensional array) which is returned by this function:

int** CreateInt(int xDim, int yDim){
    int** table = NULL;
    int i, j;
    table = (int**)malloc(xDim*sizeof(int*));
    if (table == NULL){
        puts("failed malloc");
        exit(1);
    }
    for (i = 0; i < xDim; i++){
        table[i] = (int*)malloc(yDim*sizeof(int));
        if (table[i] == NULL){
            puts("failed malloc");
            exit(1);
        }
        for (j = 0; j < yDim; j++){
            table[i][j] = 1;
        }
    }
    return table;
}

pretty basic function. so what im failing to do is reading from this array later, can't seem to access any data. this is how im trying:

void PrintInt(grid* grid){
    int i, j, add = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < grid->xDim; i++){
        for (j = 0; j < grid->yDim; j++){
            add = i*(grid->xDim-1) + j;
            printf("%d   ", *((int*)grid->table+add)); <--- PROBLEM
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
}

and this is how it all happens in the main:

grid1 = CreateGrid((*CreateInt), xDim, yDim, startX, startY, endX, endY);
PrintInt(grid1);

what im getting is 100% jibrish, any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
Please tag with the language you're using. –  Wooble Jan 9 '14 at 13:20
    
An int ** is not a two-dimensional array. Also, don't cast void * (this includes grid->table and the return type of malloc()). –  user529758 Jan 9 '14 at 13:22
    
Have you tried int** arr = (int**)(grid->table) and using arr after that? –  Kakadu Jan 9 '14 at 13:22
1  
@FelixKreuk You can access it just the way you showed: grid->table. If you assign it to a pointer to appropriate type, such as int **p = grid->table;, then you can index it as if it was your original pointer (because it is). Nothing magical here. –  user529758 Jan 9 '14 at 13:31
1  
@FelixKreuk Perhaps operator precedence (and/or misunderstanding of pointer arithmetic)? (int **)grid->table + index will increment the original pointer by index units and dereference it to obtain an int *, that needs yet another level of indirection to get to your int element. I don't know if that was what you intended to do, but if not, then here it is why it didn't work. –  user529758 Jan 9 '14 at 13:38

1 Answer 1

void PrintInt(grid* grid){
    int i, j;
    int **table = grid->table;
    for (i = 0; i < grid->xDim; i++){
        for (j = 0; j < grid->yDim; j++){
            printf("%d   ", table[i][j]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It can't for the addition and subtraction of type void *. (Although there may be cases where it operates to expect implementation.) –  BLUEPIXY Jan 9 '14 at 17:15

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