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My code is as follows:

double a,b; //These variable are inputs to the function
double *inArr; //This is also an iput to the function whose size is NumElements
double *arr = new double[numElements]; //NumElements is ~ 10^6
double sum = 0.0;
for(unsigned int i=0;i<numElements;++i)
{
    double k = a*inArr[i] + b; //This doesn't take any time
    double el = arr[i]; //This doesn't take any time
    el *= k; //This doesn't take any time
    sum += el; //This takes a long time!!!
}

This code goes over the elements of an array each time calculating a value k, for each element it adds k times that element to sum. I separated the code into so many steps so that when my profiler tells me which line takes a long time I will know exactly which calculation is the culprit. My profiler tells me that adding el to sum is what's slowing down my program (this might seem a little strange that a simple addition would be slow but I call this function hundreds of times and each time it performs millions of calculations). My only theory is that because sum is in a different scope operations using it take longer. So I edited the code to be:

double a,b; //These variable are inputs to the function
double *inArr; //This is also an iput to the function whose size is NumElements
double *arr = new double[numElements]; //NumElements is ~ 10^6
double sum = 0.0;
for(unsigned int i=0;i<numElements;++i)
{
    double k = a*inArr[i] + b; //This doesn't take any time
    double el = arr[i]; //This doesn't take any time
    el *= k; //This doesn't take any time
    double temp = sum + el; //This doesn't take any time
    sum = el; //This takes a long time!!!
}

And now the sum operation takes very little time even though it accesses the sum variable. The assignment takes a long time now. Is my theory correct that the reason this happens is that it takes longer to assign to variables that aren't in the current scope? If so why is that true? Is there any way to make this assignment work quickly? I know I can optimize this using parallelization, I want to know if I can do any better serially. I am using VS 2012 running in release mode, I am using the VS performance analyzer as a profiler.

Edit:

Once I removed the optimization it turns out that the access to inArr is what is taking the most time.

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closed as off-topic by Community, Jarod42, TemplateRex, 0x499602D2, Luchian Grigore Feb 28 '14 at 16:23

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3  
why don't you use std::accumulate(std::begin(arr), std::end(arr), 0.0, [](auto sum, auto elem){ return sum + elem * someQuickCaclc(); });? That should give you highly optimized code. –  TemplateRex Jan 9 '14 at 13:26
    
Have you tried disabling optimization (/O1, /O2) flags? That can fudge up some of the analysis. –  Jeroen Baert Jan 9 '14 at 13:27
    
How long is "a long time" that you think that line takes for each iteration? Femtoseconds? Hours? Days? –  Roddy Jan 9 '14 at 13:34
    
Not all that long, about a minute to run in release mode. –  Benjy Kessler Jan 9 '14 at 13:35
    
@BenjyKessler. No, I mean how long does that particular line take to execute once? Work it out. (and remember, the profile will slow things down). You're summing 10^6 numbers how many times in "about a minute"? –  Roddy Jan 9 '14 at 13:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are limits to what a profiler can do. If you've compiled with optimization, the compiler has probably rearranged a fair bit of code, so the profiler can't necessarily tell which line number is associated with any one particular instruction. And both the compiler and the hardware will allow for a good deal of overlapping; in many cases, the hardware will just go on to the next instruction, even if the preceding one hasn't finished, leaving a number of operations in the pipeline (and the compiler will arrange the code so that the hardware can do this most effectively). Thus, for example, the sub-expression inArr[i] involves a memory access, which is probably significantly slower than anything else. But the execution doesn't wait for it; the execution doesn't wait until it actually needs the results. (If the compiler is really clever, it may remark that arr[i] accesses uninitialized memory, which is undefined behavior, so it can skip the access, and give you any old random value.)

In your case, the compiler is probably only doing full optimization within the loop, so the execution is only stalling for the pipelined operations to finish when you write to a variable outside the loop. And the profiler thus attributes all of the time to this write.

(I've simplified greatly: for more details, I'd have to know more about the actual processor, and look at the generated code with and without optimization.)

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Thanks, this clarifies it a lot. So you're saying that code this simple really doesn't lend itself to optimizing. This is as fast as it's going to get and profilers are pretty useless at this point. –  Benjy Kessler Jan 9 '14 at 13:51
    
Maybe. I wouldn't say that it can't be made faster, for a specific machine, nor that profilers are useless. The profiler won't indicate exactly which line you have to tune, but it is still useful in telling you whether a change has improved the overall performance of the function. As for what changes to make in the function, you'll more or less have to guess and experiment. And be aware that a change which improves performance on your machine might slow the code down on another machine. (I don't see anything you can do to improve performance portably.) –  James Kanze Jan 10 '14 at 9:30

Is my theory correct that the reason this happens is that it takes longer to assign to variables that aren't in the current scope?

No.

Your profiler is lying to you, and pinpointing the wrong source for the delay. Short of parallelisation this code cannot be optimised meaningfully without any knowledge of someQuickCalc. All the other operations are quite elementary.

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Where is the real source of the delay then? –  Benjy Kessler Jan 9 '14 at 13:25
2  
@BenjyKessler Impossible to say from the code you’ve posted. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 9 '14 at 13:26
    
OK I will put in someQuickCalc() –  Benjy Kessler Jan 9 '14 at 13:26

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