Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

According to the first answer to this question, the functor below should be able to retain a value after being passed to foreach ( I couldn't get the struct Accumulator in the example to compile, so built a class).

class Accumulator
{
    public:
        Accumulator(): counter(0){}
        int counter;
        void operator()(const Card & c) { counter += i; }
};

Example usage ( as per the example )

// Using a functor
Accumulator acc;
std::for_each(_cards.begin(), _cards.end(), acc);
// according to the example - acc.counter contains the sum of all
// elements of the deque 

std::cout << acc.counter << std::endl;

_cards is implemented as a std::deque<Card>. No matter how long _cards gets, acc.counter is zero after the for_each completes. As I step through in the debugger I can see counter incrementing, however, so is it something to do with acc being passed by value?

share|improve this question
    
Hey refer this one. Its the same question stackoverflow.com/questions/2102056/… –  Yogesh Arora Jan 20 '10 at 14:59
    
I've used counter as a simple example to explain the concept. Actually what I want to do is retain values faceup and facedown, i.e. iterate through the deque and query each Card in the deque, keeping count of face up or down. –  BeeBand Jan 20 '10 at 15:03
    
What about using a static variable in the functor? –  ALOToverflow Jan 20 '10 at 17:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This was just asked here.

The reason is that (as you guessed) std::for_each copies its functor, and calls on it. However, it also returns it, so as outlined in the answer linked to above, use the return value for for_each.

That said, you just need to use std::accumulate:

int counter = std::accumulate(_cards.begin(), _cards.end(), 0);

A functor and for_each isn't correct here.


For your usage (counting some, ignoring others), you'll probably need to supply your own functor and use count_if:

// unary_function lives in <functional>
struct is_face_up : std::unary_function<const Card&, const bool>
{
    const bool operator()(const card& pC) const
    {
        return pC.isFaceUp(); // obviously I'm guessing
    }
};

int faceUp = std::count_if(_cards.begin(), _cards.end(), is_face_up());
int faceDown = 52 - faceUp;

And with C++0x lambda's for fun (just because):

int faceUp = std::count_if(_cards.begin(), _cards.end(),
                            [](const Card& pC){ return pC.isFaceUp(); });

Much nicer.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Happy now?! :-) By the way, does my comment above regarding faceup and facedown still invalidate the need for for_each? I'm thinking std::accumulate is not quite what I'm after. –  BeeBand Jan 20 '10 at 15:06
    
No, it's sill right. However, the count in your case will be a std::pair<int, int> –  MSalters Jan 20 '10 at 15:13

Yes, it's definitely linked to acc being passed by value.

Modify your accumulator as follows :

class Accumulator
{
    public:
        Accumulator(): counter(new int(0)){}
        boost::shared_ptr<int> counter;
        void operator()(int i) { *counter += i; }

        int value() { return *counter; }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Ew, heap allocation just to get the result? –  GManNickG Jan 20 '10 at 14:57
1  
@GMan: Yes. I'm come to the conclusion that std::for_each is almost an anti-pattern -- something that looks like it should be useful, but in nearly every case does something just wrong enough that using it is counterproductive. –  Jerry Coffin Jan 20 '10 at 15:01
    
@Jerry: Somewhat, I agree. It's often more work that just doing it by hand. Luckily lambdas make for_each one of the most used algorithms, I think. –  GManNickG Jan 20 '10 at 15:02
1  
@GMan:Yes, lambdas help in a way, but in another way they actually do even more harm. Think of for_each as a hammer. It doesn't work well for driving screws. Using for_each with lambdas is often equivalent to using a big enough sledge hammer that it can drive screws (in a fashion). A screwdriver still works better... –  Jerry Coffin Jan 20 '10 at 15:29
1  
@GMan:Not only are there "simpler alternatives for specific tasks", but I'd go so far as to say there are superior alternatives of nearly all tasks. –  Jerry Coffin Jan 20 '10 at 16:18

This is because internally the std::for_each() makes a copy of the functor (as it is poassable to pass temporary object). So internally it does do the sum on the copy not on the object you provided.

The good news is that std::for_each() returns a copy of the functor as a result so you can access it from there.

Note: There are other standard algorithms you could use. Like std::accumulate().
But suppose this is just a simplified example and you need for_each() to something slightly tricker than the example there are a couple of techniques to allow you access to the accumulator object.

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

class Card{ public: int i;};
class Accumulator
{
    public:
        Accumulator(): counter(0){}
        int counter;
        void operator()(const Card & c) { counter += c.i; }
};


int main()
{
    std::vector<Card>   cards;

    Accumulator a = std::for_each(cards.begin(), cards.end(), Accumulator());

    std::cout << a.counter << std::endl;

}

Alternatively you can change you Accumalator to increment a reference that is used within the current scope.

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

class Card{ public: int i;};
class Accumulator
{
        int&  counter;
    public:
        // Pass a reference to constructor.
        // Copy construction will pass this correctly into the internal object used by for_each
        Accumulator(int& counterRef): counter(counterRef){}
        void operator()(const Card & c) { counter += c.i; }
};


int main()
{
    std::vector<Card>   cards;

    int counter = 0;  // Count stored here.

    std::for_each(cards.begin(), cards.end(), Accumulator(counter));

    std::cout << counter << std::endl;

}
share|improve this answer
    
Copying for each iteration is probably an exaggeration. It just takes the predicate by value, the only thinkable alternative being accepting it by const reference - which still wouldn't allow this usage (non-const operator()). –  UncleBens Jan 20 '10 at 16:04
    
@UncleBens, yes, debug revealed that the default ctor gets called once (I assume on the Accumulator acc declaration) and then a Copy Ctor gets called twice - regardless of _cards.size(). –  BeeBand Jan 20 '10 at 16:12
    
Missworded. Will correct. –  Loki Astari Jan 20 '10 at 17:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.