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The following code finds in a string the names of regex like groups to be replaced. I would like to use this so as to change the names name_1, name_2 and not_escaped to test_name_1, test_name_2 and test_not_escaped respectively. In the matches m, each name is equal to m.group(2). How can I do that ?

p = re.compile(r"(?<!\\)(\\\\)*\\g<([a-zA-Z_][a-zA-Z\d_]*)>")

text = r"</\g<name_1>\g<name_2>\\\\\g<not_escaped>\\g<escaped>>>"

for m in p.finditer(text):
    print(
        '---',
        m.group(),
        m.group(2)
    )

This gives the following output.

---
\g<name_1>
name_1

---
\g<name_2>
name_2

---
\\\\\g<not_escaped>
not_escaped
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You'd need to reproduce the whole group 0 text, using \<digit> back-references to re-used captured groups:

p.sub(r'\1\\g<test_\2>', text)

Here \1 refers to the initial backslashes group, and \2 to the name to be prefixed by test_.

For this to work, you do need to move the * into the first capturing group to make sure that captured group was not un-matched:

p = re.compile(r"(?<!\\)((?:\\\\)*)\\g<([a-zA-Z_][a-zA-Z\d_]*)>")

I've used a non-capturing group ((?:...)) to still keep the backslashes grouped together.

Demo:

>>> text = r"</\g<name_1>\g<name_2>\\\\\g<not_escaped>\\g<escaped>>>"
>>> p = re.compile(r"(?<!\\)((?:\\\\)*)\\g<([a-zA-Z_][a-zA-Z\d_]*)>")
>>> print(p.sub(r'\1\\g<test_\2>', text))
</\g<test_name_1>\g<test_name_2>\\\\\g<test_not_escaped>\\g<escaped>>>
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I have to go but I will accept your answer later. This works fine. Thanks ! –  user1054158 Jan 9 at 15:26
    
I have to use \\g instead of g. I will correct your answer if you don't have the time to do it. It's time to go for me... –  user1054158 Jan 9 at 15:30
    
@projetmbc: corrected. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 9 at 15:40
    
@projetmbc and Martjin, you can also use (?:\\.) instead of (?:\\\\). It's just that I find the former less hard on the eyes :) –  Jerry Jan 9 at 16:14
    
@Jerry: That would match \! too, or or any other character. . doesn't repeat, it is itself a meta character that matches anything except newline (and even newlines if you set the right flag). –  Martijn Pieters Jan 9 at 16:15

The easiest way to accomplish this is by using a series of three simple calls to str.replace rather than using regexes for replacement:

import re

p = re.compile(r"(?<!\\)(\\\\)*\\g<([a-zA-Z_][a-zA-Z\d_]*)>")

text = r"</\g<name_1>\g<name_2>\\\\\g<not_escaped>\\g<escaped>>>"

for m in p.finditer(text):
    if m.groups(2):
        replacement = m.groups(2)[1]
        text = text.replace(replacement, 'test_' + replacement)
share|improve this answer
    
My question doesn't indicate another constraint that makes fail your code which doesn't work with r"</\g<name_1>\\g<name_1>" that will become </\g<test_name_1>\\g<test_name_1> instead of </\g<test_name_1>\\g<name_1>. –  user1054158 Jan 9 at 19:22

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