Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am implementing a frontend compiler for a toy language targeting LLVM-IR and I encounter a stack overflow when running compiled while statements:

For example, this code should run forever but our compiled version stack-overflows after some time.

def run(): Void = {
    i = 0;
    while(true) {
        i = i + 1;
    }
}

And here is the comipled LLVM-IR:

define i32 @run() nounwind ssp {
    ; i = 0
    %i = alloca i32, align 4
    %1 = alloca i32, align 4
    store i32 0, i32* %1, align 4
    %2 = load i32* %1, align 4
    store i32 %2, i32* %i, align 4
    br label %3

; <label>: %3
    ; while(true)
    ; Generated by compileExpression(condition)
    %4 = alloca i1, align 4
    store i1 true, i1* %4, align 4
    %5 = load i1* %4, align 4
    br i1 %5, label %6, label %11

; <label>: %6
    ; i = i + 1
    ; Generated by compileExpression(body)
    %7 = load i32* %i, align 4
    %8 = alloca i32, align 4
    store i32 1, i32* %8, align 4
    %9 = load i32* %8, align 4
    %10 = add nsw i32 %7, %9
    store i32 %10, i32* %i, align 4
    br label %3

; <label>: %11
    %12 = load i32* %i, align 4
    ret i32 %12
}

We think our problem comes from every alloca that are not released because we are still in the same function.

LLVM Documentation:

'alloca'd memory is automatically released when the function returns.

How should we compile the while loop?
Can we avoid this problem?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You generate bad IR: specifically, alloca in a loop is a bad idea, and can indeed cause a stack overflow.

What I would expect to see is an alloca outside the loop, then a load, add and store sequence inside the loop. Later on you can run the mem2reg pass, which will get rid of the allocas and convert the load and store to a more efficient phi.

Same thing for your alloca for the while condition: You need to do the same, prepare memory in advance and inside the loop only store to it.

share|improve this answer

Use the mem2reg pass to conver the allocas to register values. Register values are released when they reach there last use.

share|improve this answer
    
Will this work when while statements have bigger conditions/body expressions ? –  anotherCode245 Jan 9 at 16:55
    
Yes, it works at the ir level so just takes longer with more instructions. –  user1937198 Jan 9 at 17:12
    
We tried opt -S -mem2reg test.ll -o test.ll we still have some alloca in the body, so we still have a stack overflow. –  Binary Brain Jan 9 at 20:47
define i32 @run() nounwind ssp {
    ; i = 0
    %i = alloca i32, align 4
    %1 = alloca i32, align 4
    store i32 0, i32* %1, align 4
    %2 = load i32* %1, align 4
    store i32 %2, i32* %i, align 4
    %3 = alloca i1, align 4
    store i1 true, i1* %3, align 4
    %4 = alloca i32, align 4
    br label %whilecond

whilecond:
    ; while(true)
    ; Generated by compileExpression(condition)
    %5 = load i1* %3, align 4
    br i1 %5, label %whilebody, label %whileexit

whilebody:
    ; i = i + 1
    ; Generated by compileExpression(body)
    %6 = load i32* %i, align 4
    store i32 1, i32* %4, align 4
    %7 = load i32* %4, align 4
    %8 = add nsw i32 %6, %7
    store i32 %8, i32* %i, align 4
    br label %whilecond

whileexit:
    %9 = load i32* %i, align 4
    ret i32 %9
}

after opt -mem2reg results to :

define i32 @run() #0 {
       br label %whilecond

whilecond:                                        ; preds = %whilebody, %0
       %i.0 = phi i32 [ 0, %0 ], [ %1, %whilebody ]
       br i1 true, label %whilebody, label %whileexit

whilebody:                                        ; preds = %whilecond
       %1 = add nsw i32 %i.0, 1
       br label %whilecond

whileexit:                                        ; preds = %whilecond
       ret i32 %i.0
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.