Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm implementing a custom segue using controller containment API, e.g.

@implementation CustomSegue

- (void)perform {
    UIViewController *sourceViewController = self.sourceViewController;
    UIViewController *destinationViewController = self.destinationViewController;

    [sourceViewController addChildViewController:destinationViewController];
    destinationViewController.view.alpha = 0.0;
    [sourceViewController.view addSubview:destinationViewController.view];
    [UIView animateWithDuration:0.3 animations:^{
        destinationViewController.view.alpha = 1.0;
    } completion:^(BOOL finished) {
        [destinationViewController didMoveToParentViewController:sourceViewController];
    }];
}

@end

View controller hierarchy is trivial: sourceViewController → destinationViewController

When unwinding from the destinationViewController to the sourceViewController, app crashes in [UIStoryboardUnwindSegueTemplate _perform:] with exception Could not find a view controller to execute unwinding for <…>

I did not implement custom -[UIViewController viewControllerForUnwindSegueAction:fromViewController:withSender: or -[UIViewController canPerformUnwindSegueAction:fromViewController:withSender: which means framework returns correct values (although I implemented it once to check).

When replacing my custom addChildViewController:… code with presentViewController:… in the segue, it works fine: unwinding performs like expected.

The question: is it possible to have a custom segue that creates a custom view controller hierarchy?

Test case project: https://bitbucket.org/zats/unwind/

share|improve this question
    
Don't think it will solve your issue, but... You should really have a container controller that contains the source controller, then add the destination controller to the container too. Then do the animations, then remove the source controller. It's a bit odd to add the destination controller to the source controller. Here's an example of a perform, that makes the right calls to the right things, and changes the view controller hierarchy pastebin.com/Vk9JfcmP. May be of some use? – George Green Jan 9 '14 at 17:25
    
it doesn't really change the fact that the code crashes:) hierarchy is not that important for me at the moment – Sash Zats Jan 9 '14 at 20:42
    
Could be that a corrupt hierarchy is causing issues though... – George Green Jan 10 '14 at 11:11
    
You might be right, but I tried to validate consistency of the view controller / view hierarchy – seems ok to me – Sash Zats Jan 10 '14 at 12:01

I think that George Green's comment is relevant, and the way you have your controllers set up is the cause of the crash. I think to do what you want, you should have ZTSFirstViewController added as a child to a custom container controller which will do the unwinding, and the (forward) segue will exchange the children of that custom container controller (switch from ZTSFirstViewController to ZTSSecondViewController). The viewControllerForUnwindSegueAction:fromViewController:withSender: method needs to be implemented in the custom container controller (ViewController in my example). I tested this by adding a container view in IB to ViewController, and changed the class of the embedded controller to ZTSFirstViewController. I added a segue from a button in ZTSFirstViewController to ZTSSecondViewController, and connected the unwind segue from a button in that controller. The unwind: method is in ZTSFirstViewController. The code in the custom segue was this,

- (void)perform {
        UIViewController *destinationViewController = self.destinationViewController;
        UIViewController *sourceViewController = self.sourceViewController;

        if (!self.unwind) {
            [sourceViewController.parentViewController addChildViewController:destinationViewController];
            destinationViewController.view.alpha = 0.0;
            [sourceViewController.parentViewController.view addSubview:destinationViewController.view];
            [UIView animateWithDuration:0.3 animations:^{
                destinationViewController.view.alpha = 1.0;
            } completion:^(BOOL finished) {
                [destinationViewController didMoveToParentViewController:sourceViewController.parentViewController];
            }];
        } else {
            [self.sourceViewController willMoveToParentViewController:nil];
            [UIView animateWithDuration:0.3 animations:^{
                sourceViewController.view.alpha = 0.0;
            } completion:^(BOOL finished) {
                [sourceViewController.view removeFromSuperview];
                [sourceViewController removeFromParentViewController];
            }];
        }
    }

I kept this segue close to your implementation -- it doesn't actually switch the controllers, it just adds the second one as a second child and hides the view of the first.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer rdelmar, I tried it, too. I guess I didn't phrase my question correctly, my current setup works if custom segue replaced with built-in ones, that what causes the question. Apple demoed in wwdc's for 2012 (video 407, last 10 minutes) how it's possible to have a segues + unwinding with root controller. Their setup is quite similar: d.pr/i/eefI. So, unless, I'm missing something, the question still stands: is it possible to have a setup where root view controller adds a child view controller through the segue and removes it through unwinding. – Sash Zats Jan 10 '14 at 12:00
    
@SashaZats, I'll look into that video later when I have more time. I don't really see any advantage to using an unwind segue in this situation. The parent and child already have references to each other, so sending data back to the parent is no problem -- one of the main advantages to using unwinds, I think, is for sending data back to a distant controller where it's difficult to set up the normal delegate pattern, or for going back several controllers where you've gone forward with a mixture of pushes and presents. – rdelmar Jan 10 '14 at 18:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.