Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm scanning a text document, and it is formatted like so:

3 10
1
2
2
1
3
1
1
1
2
2
The first two integers at the top represent the amount of candidates and the number of votes respectively. I'm having difficulty detecting the string for the amount of votes, "10"

Since I'm working in c++, I've tried doing this so far:

string line;
int candidateTally;
int voteTally;

ifstream file("votes.txt");

//detect the candidate tally "3"
getline(file, line);
candidateTally = atoi(line.c_str());

cout << candidateTally << endl;

//output the candidate tally "10" but it's only outputting "1"
getline(file, line);
cout << line;

I'm not quite sure how to pick up the second char for 0 to get the full string of "10" It seems like the getline function cuts off before picking up 0, because that might represent the '\n' char? I'd like to have it so that it detects the '0' and includes it in the string with "1" so that I can convert that to the int that it is supposed to be, 10.

How can I fix this?

share|improve this question
    
Why not just simply read the data with file>>x, where x is an integer? –  barak manos Jan 9 at 16:21
    
'0' does not represent '\r'. You should take a look at an ASCII table. Your problem is entirely the misunderstanding of std::getline. –  Zac Howland Jan 9 at 16:43

3 Answers 3

Ask yourself what getline does... Yes, it gets a line.

So the first call 'gets' the entire line "3 10", and the second call gets the next line in the file : "1"

You should use the >> operator to read incoming values from the file. This will also remove the need to mess with atoi() and char pointers.

share|improve this answer

Use the following instead:

int candidateTally;
int voteTally;

ifstream file("votes.txt");

//detect the candidate tally "3", and the vote tally "10".
file >> candidateTally >> voteTally;

cout << candidateTally << endl;
cout << voteTally << endl;

The operator>> ignores whitespace. Its first call (file >> candidateTally) will "eat" the "3", and the second call (>> votetally) will skip the whitespace, then pick up "10". The precision can be read here, but the details are quite hard to read.

share|improve this answer
    
Remember that the >> operator ignores whitespace if this doesn't make sense. –  Keeler Jan 9 at 16:24
    
@Keeler Can you give an example? As far as I know, the operator>> always ignore whitespace. What do you mean by "if if does not make sense"? –  lrineau Jan 9 at 16:30
    
Example is correct. operator>> does ignore whitespace. Sorry, the comment was for folks who might not understand why your example works. –  Keeler Jan 9 at 16:36
    
You are right. I have tried to edit my answer to clarify it. Fell free to edit it if you find a way how to make it clearer. –  lrineau Jan 9 at 16:41
    
Small edit, and upvoted. This is the correct, idiomatic way to do read input in this case. –  Keeler Jan 9 at 16:46

If you are going to get the line for the number of candidates and votes, there is no reason to use atoi:

std::string line;
int candidateTally;
int voteTally;

std::ifstream file("votes.txt");

if (std::getline(file, line))
{
    std::istringstream iss(line);
    iss >> candidateTally >> voteTally; // you should also add error handling here
    // ...
}
else
{
    // handle the error here
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.