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I am working on a 2D tile-based platformer in Java with Libgdx as a personal project.

I have a player object with an instance of PlayerState:

public abstract class PlayerState {
    public abstract void handleInput(Player player);
    public abstract void enter(Player player);
    public abstract void exit(Player player);
    public abstract void update(Player player, float stateTime);
}

When my player's state changes I re-instantiate my PlayerState object like so:

player.setState(new JumpingState());

Here is an example of my state classes - it is essentially one state per sprite animation:

public class IdleState extends PlayerState{

public IdleState(){

}

@Override
public void handleInput(Player player) {
    if (Gdx.input.isKeyPressed(21))
        player.setState(new RunningState());
    else if (Gdx.input.isKeyPressed(22))
        player.setState(new RunningState());
    else if (Gdx.input.isKeyPressed(19))
        player.setState(new JumpingState());
}

@Override
public void enter(Player player) {
    player.setGraphics("idle", Animation.LOOP);
    //player.setGrounded(true);
}

@Override
public void exit(Player player) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub

}

@Override
public void update(Player player, float stateTime) {
    player.getAcceleration().x=0;
}

}

I understand that the idea of using a state machine in this manner is to encapsulate all the code that deals with each state. However I'm finding myself setting lots of boolean flages outside of these classes to check when I should change state.

Is it acceptable to transition to a new state outside of these state classes? I feel this defeats the purpose of the state pattern.

Is there a better way to structure my code for this?

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