Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I convert date with timezone1 to date with device local timezone2?

NSDateFormatter *dateFormat = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
[dateFormat setDateFormat:@"YYYY-MM-dd HH:mm:ss"];
[dateFormat setTimeZone:[NSTimeZone timeZoneWithName:@"Asia/Jerusalem"]];
NSDate *date = [dateFormat dateFromString:timestamp];

then something like:
[dateFormat2 setTimeZone:[NSTimeZone localTimeZone]];
date2 = [dateFormat2 dateFromDate:date withOtherTimeZone:zone];

UPDATE:

I think I got it.

//get source date from the server
NSDateFormatter *dateFormat = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
[dateFormat setDateFormat:@"YYYY-MM-dd HH:mm:ss"];
NSDate *sourceDate = [dateFormat dateFromString:timestamp];

//set timezones
NSTimeZone* sourceTimeZone = [NSTimeZone timeZoneWithName:@"Asia/Jerusalem"];
NSTimeZone* destinationTimeZone = [NSTimeZone systemTimeZone];

//calc time difference
NSInteger sourceGMTOffset = [sourceTimeZone secondsFromGMTForDate:sourceDate];
NSInteger destinationGMTOffset = [destinationTimeZone secondsFromGMTForDate:sourceDate];
NSTimeInterval interval = destinationGMTOffset - sourceGMTOffset;

//set current real date
NSDate* date = [[NSDate alloc] initWithTimeInterval:interval sinceDate:sourceDate];

Is it ok?

share|improve this question
    
You might want to do a little studying first. NSDate does not "have" a timezone. –  Hot Licks Jan 9 at 19:00
    
You shouldn't. It's one thing to display a date to the user in different formats and timezones but there is little reason to actually convert an NSDate. Why do you think you need to? –  rmaddy Jan 9 at 19:00
    
We have a chat section in our app that receive timestamps from the server. The timestamps are according to server's timezone, and we want to show the user the current time he received the message and not the global server time. This can be reached with the local timezone of the device, am I right? –  assafey Jan 9 at 21:46
add comment

2 Answers 2

OK first off, time is time. At this very second, everywhere on earth, its is the same second. Stop thinking of time format as time. It's not. All time should be in GMT, and then you can display it based on TimeZone.

Date *d = [NSDate date] ;
NSDateFormatter *df = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
[dateFormat setDateFormat:@"YYYY-MM-dd HH:mm:ss Z"];
NSTimeZone *nyTimeZone = [NSTimeZone timeZoneWithAbbreviation:@"sometimeabbr."];
NSTimeZone *localTimeZone = [NSTimeZone systemTimeZone];
[df setTimezone: nyTimeZone];
NSLog(@"ny time is %@" , [df stringFromDate: d]);
[df setTimeZone: localTimeZone];
NSLog(@"local time is %@" , [df stringFromDate: d]);

If you are given a string date and need to convert, create NSDateFormatter to ingest the string date. Make sure you set a timezone. Now you have a NSDate object (no timezone in NSDates), that yiou can format into any other timezone you want.

Please for the love all all that is holy. Treat time as seconds that marches forward, and timezones as the formatting of those timezones.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the correct answer. The date is the same in the server as in the client, it's just that it is formatted for a different time zone when converting it to a string for display. Also, if the response from the server comes as a string with a timezone, the TZ specification will be ignored (which is the right thing to do, as it could potentially be using UTC, so the previous answer would give a wrong result since it is forcing the time to be interpreted as if coming from a certain timezone) –  Victor Jalencas Apr 28 at 19:27
add comment
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is the answer:

NSTimeZone* sourceTimeZone = [NSTimeZone timeZoneWithName:@"Asia/Jerusalem"];
NSTimeZone* destinationTimeZone = [NSTimeZone systemTimeZone];

//calc time difference
NSInteger sourceGMTOffset = [sourceTimeZone secondsFromGMTForDate:sourceDate];
NSInteger destinationGMTOffset = [destinationTimeZone secondsFromGMTForDate:sourceDate];
NSTimeInterval interval = destinationGMTOffset - sourceGMTOffset;

//set current real date
NSDate* date = [[NSDate alloc] initWithTimeInterval:interval sinceDate:sourceDate];
share|improve this answer
    
Please consider accepting John's answer, as it is the right way to do it. –  Victor Jalencas Apr 28 at 19:28
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.