Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here's an example snippet:

int i = 4,b;    
b = foo(i++) + foo(i++);

I'm pretty certain it's not undefined, because there is a sequence point before the invocation of foo. However, if I compile the code with the -Wall flag a compiler warning is generated which says warning: operation on 'i' may be undefined. I realize it says may, but I'd just like to double check if I'm correct.

share|improve this question
2  
Whether it's defined or not, you shouldn't program like this. –  Fiddling Bits Jan 9 '14 at 21:32
1  
There's a sequence point before the call to foo, but there's no sequence point that's necessarily between the two evaluations of i++. The generated code could evaluate the first i++, then evaluate the second i++, then perform the two function calls, then add the results. C11 (see the N1570 draft changes the way this is described and may be clearer. –  Keith Thompson Jan 9 '14 at 21:33
1  
So it’s not actually undefined if foo doesn’t have side effects and does only depend on it’s argument if I get this correctly. –  Jonas Wielicki Jan 9 '14 at 21:34
2  
@JonasWielicki: No, it's undefined regardless, because i is modified twice with no intervening sequence point (in C99 terms). –  Keith Thompson Jan 9 '14 at 21:35
1  
@mafso: As I said above, I believe both instances of i++ could be evaluated before either function call takes place. N1570 6.5.2.2p10: "There is a sequence point after the evaluations of the function designator and the actual arguments but before the actual call. Every evaluation in the calling function (including other function calls) that is not otherwise specifically sequenced before or after the execution of the body of the called function is indeterminately sequenced with respect to the execution of the called function." –  Keith Thompson Jan 9 '14 at 21:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The behavior is undefined.

b = foo(i++) + foo(i++);

As you say, there's a sequence point between the evaluation of the first i++ and the call to foo, and likewise between the evaluation of the second i++ and the call foo. But there isn't (necessarily) a sequence point between the two evaluations of i++, or more specifically between their side effects (modifying i).

Quoting the N1570 draft of the 2011 ISO C standard, section 6.5.2.2p10:

There is a sequence point after the evaluations of the function designator and the actual arguments but before the actual call. Every evaluation in the calling function (including other function calls) that is not otherwise specifically sequenced before or after the execution of the body of the called function is indeterminately sequenced with respect to the execution of the called function.

The second sentence is significant here: the two evaluations of i++ are "indeterminately sequenced" with respect to the two function calls, meaning that they can occur either before or after the calls to foo. (They're not unsequenced, though; each of them occurs either before or after the calls, but it's unspecified which.)

And 6.5p2 says:

If a side effect on a scalar object is unsequenced relative to either a different side effect on the same scalar object or a value computation using the value of the same scalar object, the behavior is undefined. If there are multiple allowable orderings of the subexpressions of an expression, the behavior is undefined if such an unsequenced side effect occurs in any of the orderings.

Putting this together, a conforming implementation could evaluate the expression in this order:

  1. Evaluate the first i++ and save the value somewhere.
  2. Evaluate the second i++and save the value somewhere.
  3. Call foo, passing the first saved value as an argument.
  4. Call foo, passing the second saved value as an argument.
  5. Add the two results.
  6. Store the sum in b.

There is no sequence point between steps 1 and 2, both of which modify i, so the behavior is undefined.

(That's actually a slight oversimplification; the side effect of modifying i can be separated from the determination of the result of i++.

Bottom line: We know that

b = i++ + i++;

has undefined behavior, for reasons that have been explained repeatedly. Wrapping the i++ subexpressions in function calls does add some sequence points, but those sequence points don't separate the two evaluations of i++ and therefore don't cause the behavior to become well defined.

Even bottommer line: Please don't write code like that. Even if the behavior were well defined, it would be more difficult than it's worth to prove it and to determine what the behavior should be.

share|improve this answer
    
I've read the part of the standard you copied and pasted like 3-4 times and still don't really understand it, although I feel that your interpretation is correct. Either way I won't program like this, I just posted this question to get a better understanding of sequence points. –  jucestain Jan 9 '14 at 23:23
1  
If you need to understand sequence points, you are coding badly. –  Martin James Jan 10 '14 at 1:08
    
@MartinJames It was a purely academic question. Just trying to understand C better. –  jucestain Jan 10 '14 at 3:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.