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Suppose I have two variadic functions like this:

function a(num)
  if num == 1 then
    return 1
  else
    return 1, 2
  end
end    

function b(num)
  if num == 1 then
    return 1
  else
    return 1, 2
  end
end

I then want to build another function that calls both a and b and returns all the results from a followed by all the results from b. I want to write something like this:

function c(num)
  return a(num), b(num)
end

But it only returns the first result from a, followed by all the results from b. How would I do this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can only return all the results of the last function in an expression list; the others will be truncated to one results.

As a result, this

function f1()
    return 1
end

function f2()
    return 2, 3
end

print(f1(), f2())

Prints 1 2 3 as expected, but this

print(f2(), f1())

Prints 2 1, because f2() was truncated to one result.

As a workaround, if you know the number of results ahead of time, you can do

local a, b = f1()
local c, d = f2()
return a, b, c, d

Or for arbitrary number of results, you can do

local t1 = {f1()}
local t2 = {f2()}
-- Append t2 to t1
return unpack(t1)
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When you expand a list into a list context, either only the first item is used, or, if the expansion is taking place at the end of the list context, all the items are used. (Sorry, for the Perl-ish terminology.)

You can capture all list items in the table constructor { a(num) }. Since the list is expanded as the last item in the list context, all items are used.

Going back the other way, you can reduce a table into a list using the unpack function. However, it uses the table "length" concept, which only applies to continuous sequence arrays. Since function results may contain nil anywhere, you have to measure the number of items in the table by counting, and iterate the table using the pairs function.

local function a(num)
  if num == 1 then
    return 1
  else
    return nil, 2
  end
end    

local function b(num)
  if num == 1 then
    return 1
  else
    return nil, 2
  end
end

.

local function c(num)
    local t = {}
    local n = 0
    local bOffset = 0 
    for k, v in pairs({ a(num) }) do
        table.insert(t, k, v)
        if (k > n) then
            n = k
        end
        if (k > bOffset) then
            bOffset = k
        end
    end
    for k, v in pairs({ b(num) }) do
        table.insert(t, bOffset + k, v)
        if (bOffset + k > n) then
            n = bOffset + k
        end
    end

    return unpack(t, 1, n) 
end
print(nil,2,nil,2)
print(c(0202))
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