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I have been searching for a while but could not find an answer to this question. I would like to match the output of a specific command to an array that is in my script. I am a perl coder but limitations of the type of system I have to use I cannot use perl and I have to resort to bash for my script. It's Debian 5.0.6 as an FYI.

So whenever my sudo command is run on a specific IP it gives certain words that are in my array. I need to match those any of those words in the array to whatever it gives out in the output.

Also this array is 228 different things it needs to look through.

My email variable is to send when it finds one and works just fine by itself.

array=("City1" "City2" "City 3")

sudo -u user /usr/local/bin/someprogram.pl x.x.x.x;
MATCH1=`grep "$array"`
if [ "{$MATCH1}" != ""]
then
    do $email
else done
fi

I appreciate any kind of help with this. I apologize for my bash scripting ignorance.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If I understood your question correctly: you could iterate through each line returned, and iterate through each pattern, and if there is a match then email.

sudo -u user /usr/local/bin/someprogram.pl x.x.x.x | while read line; do
    for pattern in "${array[@]}"; do
        if [[ $line =~ $pattern ]]; then
            $email
            break  # exit after the first match, or comment out if you want to keep going
        fi
    done
done

UPDATE

If you have a lot of patterns and a lot of lines, the script might be slow. Maybe you could print a dot per line as "progress indicator", for example like this:

sudo -u user /usr/local/bin/someprogram.pl x.x.x.x | while read line; do
    printf .       # prints a dot without linebreak
    for pattern in "${array[@]}"; do
        if [[ $line =~ $pattern ]]; then
            echo   # just to clear the line after the printf statements
            $email
            break  # exit after the first match, or comment out if you want to keep going
        fi
    done
done
echo   # clear the line after the printf statements
share|improve this answer
    
This is good but it doesn't return any lines like it used to just sits there for a minute then returns me to my prompt. I am not getting any errors either from it but just seems weird. Thanks a lot. –  Nvasion Jan 10 '14 at 17:28
    
@Nvasion I updated my post with another version of the script using some kind of "progress indicator", if it helps. –  janos Jan 10 '14 at 19:23
    
Yeah it goes through 10 lines ips and then goes through 228 items in the array the final script takes like 10 minutes to run. I still have the other engineer running the commands manually and I am running this script for a week to make sure it is doing what its supposed to. But thanks alot. –  Nvasion Jan 13 '14 at 17:28

I think Janos's solution is better because it is more readable and maintainable but here is solution that more resembles the code template you provided:

#!/bin/bash

printWords() {
  echo City 1 City x
  echo City 2
  echo City y
  echo City 3
}

CMD_OUTPUT=$(printWords)

array=("City 1" "City 3")

MATCH=$(echo $CMD_OUTPUT | grep -E "${array[0]}${array[*]/#/|}")

if [ -n "$MATCH" ] ; then
    echo email
fi

${array[0]}${array[*]/#/$(echo \|)} results in City 1|City 1 |City 3 in this case. The second substitution ${array[*]/#/|} matches the (empty) beginning of each array element and substitutes it for the pipe symbol | to construct an OR regex. The regex would however start with the pipe symbol and thus match also any empty string which is why I prepend the first element of the array. Also notice the use of [@] vs. [*].

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Thanks a lot for helping me with this but Jano's solution may be better for what I am trying to do with it but I'll keep what you gave me handy. –  Nvasion Jan 10 '14 at 17:29

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