Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;    
struct A{
  A() {cout << "A" << endl;}
  A(int a) {cout << "A+" << endl;}
};

struct B : virtual A{
  B() : A(1) {cout << "B" << endl;}
};
struct C : virtual A{
  C() : A(1) {cout << "C" << endl;}
};
struct D : virtual A{
  D() : A() {cout << "D" << endl;}
};
struct E : B, virtual C, D{
  E(){cout << "E" << endl;}
};
struct F : D, virtual C{
  F(){cout << "F" << endl;}
};
struct G : E, F{
  G() {cout << "G" << endl;}
};

int main(){
  G g;
  return 0;
}

Program prints:

A
C
B
D
E
D
F
G

I would like to know what rules should I use to determine in what order constructors get called. Thanks.

share|improve this question
2  
The virtual bases are constructed by the most derived class before any other bases. –  Kerrek SB Jan 10 at 0:21
1  
To elaborate on @KerrekSB's comment and the fact that A+ isn't printed, note that changing D to call A(1) has the same behaviour, then have a look at this one. Now all three call A(), but G calls A(1). –  chris Jan 10 at 0:25
add comment

3 Answers 3

You should follow the rules given in the C++ standard:

[C++11: 12.6.2/10]: In a non-delegating constructor, initialization proceeds in the following order:

  • First, and only for the constructor of the most derived class (1.8), virtual base classes are initialized in the order they appear on a depth-first left-to-right traversal of the directed acyclic graph of base classes, where “left-to-right” is the order of appearance of the base classes in the derived class base-specifier-list.
  • Then, direct base classes are initialized in declaration order as they appear in the base-specifier-list (regardless of the order of the mem-initializers).
  • Then, non-static data members are initialized in the order they were declared in the class definition (again regardless of the order of the mem-initializers).
  • Finally, the compound-statement of the constructor body is executed.

[ Note: The declaration order is mandated to ensure that base and member subobjects are destroyed in the reverse order of initialization. —end note ]

share|improve this answer
add comment

Virtual base subobjects are constructed first, by the most-derived class, before any other bases. This is the only way that makes sense, since the relation of the virtual bases to tbe most-derived object is not known until object construction, at runtime (hence "virtual"). All intermediate initializers for virtual bases are ignored.

So, what are your virtual bases? G derives from E and F. E derives virtually from C, which in turn derives virtually from A, so A, C are first. Next, F doesn't add any further virtual bases. Next, E has non-virtual bases B and D, in that order, which are constructed next, and then E is complete. Then comes F's non-virtual base D, and F is complete. Finally, G is complete.

All in all, it's virtual bases A, C, then non-virtual bases B, D, E and D, F, and then G itself.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can investigate the order of constructor calls from this quote of the C++ Standard and try to trap it yourself

10 In a non-delegating constructor, initialization proceeds in the following order: — First, and only for the constructor of the most derived class (1.8), virtual base classes are initialized in the order they appear on a depth-first left-to-right traversal of the directed acyclic graph of base classes, where “left-to-right” is the order of appearance of the base classes in the derived class base-specifier-list. — Then, direct base classes are initialized in declaration order as they appear in the base-specifier-list (regardless of the order of the mem-initializers). — Then, non-static data members are initialized in the order they were declared in the class definition (again regardless of the order of the mem-initializers). — Finally, the compound-statement of the constructor body is executed. [ Note: The declaration order is mandated to ensure that base and member subobjects are destroyed in the reverse order of initialization. —end note ]

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.