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I have a controller action that takes a parameter of a custom type:

public class SomeController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Index(CustomType someValue)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

The custom type is not known by ASP.NET MVC, and it is not a "complex" type; it needs custom creation logic:

public class CustomType
{
    public CustomType(string data){}
}

In this example, I would like to be able to tell ASP.NET MVC that whenever it needs to bind to a CustomType, it should use the following procedure:

(string someRequestValue) => new CustomType(someRequestValue)

I've had a quick look around here and Google, but I didn't find anything that covered this simple scenario.

share|improve this question

Bart's answer is quite valid and I think it suits your case scenario. Yet, if you ever need to change the default model binding behaviour, it'd be good to implement your own model binder object by implementing the IModelBinder interface which exposes one single method BindModel

public class CustomTypeModelBinder : IModelBinder
{
    public object BindModel(ControllerContext controllerContext, ModelBindingContext bindingContext)
    {
        var valueReceived = bindingContext.ValueProvider.GetValue("actionParam").AttemptedValue;
        return new CustomType(valueReceived);
    }
}

Then it's just a matter of registering the model binder when your application starts...

protected void Application_Start()
{
       ModelBinders.Binders.Add(typeof(CustomType), new CustomTypeModelBinder());
}

But, as stated above, you don't really need to go down this path...I think

share|improve this answer
    
you beat me by a min ;) Nice one! – SBirthare Jan 10 '14 at 6:17
    
Oops...sorry mate :)...who cares anyway? As long as there's enough and meaningful contribution to the community of developers out there ;) – Leo Jan 10 '14 at 6:21
    
Yak... reading your comment, i thought to press Like button LOL.. habit from other social networking site... – SBirthare Jan 10 '14 at 6:29
    
Thanks! It looks like your implementation will only work if the action parameter is called actionParam. How can it be implemented so it's only dependent on CustomType rather than a specific parameter? – Sam Jan 13 '14 at 21:39
    
Never mind my last comment; I've found out how to do it myself. Thanks for pointing me in the right direction! – Sam Jan 13 '14 at 23:18
up vote 0 down vote accepted

As suggested in Leo's answer, this can be done by implementing IModelBinder and registering the implementation for CustomType. That implementation can be improved by supporting any action parameters rather than only parameters with a specific name. I've also added null-checking so that the behaviour is consistent with the built-in model binding.

Model Binder

public class CustomTypeModelBinder : IModelBinder
{
    public object BindModel(ControllerContext controllerContext,
        ModelBindingContext bindingContext)
    {
        var valueName = bindingContext.ModelName;
        var value = bindingContext.ValueProvider.GetValue(valueName);
        if (value == null)
            return null;

        var textValue = value.AttemptedValue;
        return new CustomType(textValue);
    }
}

Registration

protected void Application_Start()
{
    ModelBinders.Binders.Add(typeof(CustomType), new CustomTypeModelBinder());
}
share|improve this answer

why not :

public class SomeController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Index(string someValue)
    {
        var obj = new CustomType(someValue);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Because I want my action logic to be concise and focused on the actual logic rather than infrastructure. – Sam Jan 13 '14 at 21:37
    
Also, I expect to use CustomType in multiple action methods, and I don't want to clutter them with duplicated model binding logic. – Sam Jan 13 '14 at 21:47

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