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I came across a library written in Objective C (I only have the header file and the .a binary). In the header file, it is like this:

@interface MyClass : MySuperClass 
{ 
    //nothing here
}

@property (nonatomic, retain) MyObject anObject;
- (void)someMethod;

How can I achieve the same thing? If I try to declare a property without its corresponding ivar inside the interface's {}, the compiler will give me an error. Ultimately, I want to hide the internal structure of my class inside the .a, and just expose the necessary methods to the header file. How do I declare instance variables inside the .m? Categories don't allow me to add ivar, just methods.

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10 Answers 10

For 64 bit applications and iPhone applications (though not in the simulator), property synthesis is also capable of synthesizing the storage for an instance variable.

I.e. this works:

@interface MyClass : MySuperClass 
{ 
    //nothing here
}

@property (nonatomic, retain) MyObject *anObject;
@end

@implementation MyClass
@synthesize anObject;
@end

If you compile for 32 bit Mac OS X or the iPhone Simulator, the compiler will give an error.

share|improve this answer
    
You are right! When I switch from Simulator to Device, the error disappears. – iamj4de Jan 20 '10 at 19:29
3  
Note that, over time, the simulator has grown more and more like the iOS runtime... this works in the latest release, for example. – bbum Oct 3 '10 at 6:28

You may use of the same idiom used in Cocoa classes. If you have a look to NSString class interface in NSString.h you'll see that there is no instance variable declared. Going deeper in GNUstep source code you'll find the trick.

Consider the following code.

MyClass.h

@interface MyClass : NSObject

// Your methods here
- (void) doSomething;

@end

MyClass.m

@interface MyClassImpl : MyClass {
   // Your private and hidden instance variables here
}
@end

@implementation MyClass

+ (id) allocWithZone:(NSZone *)zone
{
   return NSAllocateObject([MyClassImpl class], 0, zone);
}

// Your methods here
- (void) doSomething {
  // This method is considered as pure virtual and cannot be invoked
  [self doesNotRecognizeSelector: _cmd];          
}

@end

@implementation MyClassImpl

// Your methods here
- (void) doSomething {
  // A real implementation of doSomething
}

@end

As you can see, the trick consist in overloading allocWithZone: in your class. This code is invoked by default alloc provided by NSObject, so you don't have to worry about which allocating method should be used (both are valid). In such allocWithZone:, you may use the Foundation function NSAllocateObject() to allocate memory and initialize isa for a MyClassImpl object instead of MyClass. After that, the user is dealing with a MyClassImpl object transparently.

Of course, the real implementation of your class shall be provided by MyClassImpl. The methods for MyClass shall be implemented in a way that considers a message receiving as an error.

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This is exactly what I was looking for and it works great. Thanks! – aleksey Jan 4 '12 at 1:25

You can use a class extension. A class extension is similar as category but without any name. On the Apple documentation they just define private methods but in fact you can also declare your internal variables.

MyClass.h

@class PublicClass;

// Public interface 
@interface MyClass : NSObject

@property (nonatomic, retain) PublicClass *publicVar;
@property (nonatomic, retain) PublicClass *publicVarDiffInternal;

- (void)publicMethod;

@end

MyClass.m

#import "PublicClass.h"
#import "InternalClass.h"

// Private interface
@interface MyClass ( /* class extension */ ) 
{
@private
    // Internal variable only used internally
    NSInteger defaultSize;

    // Internal variable only used internally as private property
    InternalClass *internalVar;  

@private 
    // Internal variable exposed as public property 
    PublicClass *publicVar;

    // Internal variable exposed as public property with an other name
    PublicClass *myFooVar;
}

@property (nonatomic, retain) InternalClass *internalVar;

- (void)privateMethod;

@end

// Full implementation of MyClass
@implementation MyClass

@synthesize internalVar;
@synthesize publicVar;
@synthesize publicVarDiffInternal = myFooVar

- (void)privateMethod 
{
}

- (void)publicMethod 
{
}

- (id)init
{
   if ((self = [super init]))
     {
       defaultSize = 512;
       self.internalVar = nil;
       self.publicVar = nil;
       self.publicVarDiffInternal = nil; // initialize myFooVar
     }

   return self;
}
@end

You can give MyClass.h to anyone with just your public API and public properties. On MyClass.m you declare your member variable private and public, and your private methods, on your class extension.

Like this it's easy to expose public interfaces and hide detail implementation. I used on my project without any troubles.

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According to the documentation I've been looking at there is no problem. All you have to do to hide instance variables is to declare them at the start of the @implementation section, inside { ... }. However, I'm a relative newcomer to Objective C and there's a chance I have misunderstood something - I suspect that the language has changed. I have actually tried this system, using XCode 4.2, building code for the iPad, and it seems to work fine.

One of my sources for this idea is the Apple developer documentation at http://developer.apple.com/library/ios/#documentation/cocoa/conceptual/objectivec/Chapters/ocDefiningClasses.html, which gives this pattern:

@implementation ClassName

{

// Instance variable declarations.

}

// Method definitions.

@end

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Two possibilities:

  1. It could be taking advantage of the modern runtime's ability to synthesize instance variables, as bbum suggested.
  2. The property might not have an underlying instance variable in that class. Properties do not necessarily have a one-to-one mapping with instance variables.
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No you can't. But you can do this if you're not using @property:

.h

@interface X : Y {
  struct X_Impl* impl;
}
-(int)getValue;
@end

.m

struct X_Impl {
  int value;
};
...
@implementation X
-(void)getValue {
  return impl->value * impl->value;
}
@end
share|improve this answer

How about a macro trick?

Have tested code below

  • have tested with dylibs - worked fine
  • have tested subclassing - Warning! will break, I agree this makes the trick not that useful, but still I think it tells some about how ObjC works...

MyClass.h

@interface MyClass : NSObject {
#ifdef MYCLASS_CONTENT
    MYCLASS_CONTENT // Nothing revealed here
#endif
}
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString *name;
@property (nonatomic, assign) int extra;
- (id)initWithString:(NSString*)str;
@end

MyClass.m

// Define the required Class content here before the #import "MyClass.h"
#define MYCLASS_CONTENT \
  NSString *_name; \
  int _extra; \
  int _hiddenThing; 

#import "MyClass.h"

@implementation MyClass
@synthesize name=_name;
@synthesize extra=_extra;

- (id)initWithString:(NSString*)str
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        self.name = str;
        self.extra = 17;
        _hiddenThing = 19;
    }
    return self;
}

- (void)dealloc
{
    [_name release];
    [super dealloc];
}

@end
share|improve this answer
    
The unprocessed header file will be unusable without the implementation file. – Chuck Jan 20 '10 at 19:00
    
Made a quick test, worked just fine. Might be worth a blog post later... – epatel Jan 20 '10 at 19:11
    
Thanks, nice trick. If you do write a blog post, please give the link here. – iamj4de Jan 20 '10 at 19:28
1  
Have checked by calling NSLog(@"%s: %d", __FILE__, class_getInstanceSize([MyClass class])); both within MyClass.m and outside...gives same value so I think it's pretty safe too – epatel Jan 20 '10 at 19:31
    
No, it cannot possibly work in a project that does not have the .m file. You're saying you tested with just the .h and a compiled .a library and it worked? – Chuck Jan 20 '10 at 20:03

DON'T do this, but I feel it should be noted that the runtime has the ability to add ivars whenever you want with class_addIvar

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1  
You cannot add instance variables once a class is registered. As all classes generated by the compiler are automatically registered, this only applies to classes created by calling objc_allocateClassPair – rpetrich Mar 31 '12 at 20:22

I was able to do the following in my library:

myLib.h:

@interface MyClass : SomeSuperClass <SomeProtocol> {
  // Nothing in here
}

- (void)someMethods;
@end

myLib.m

@interface MyClass () 
    SomeClass *someVars;

    @property (nonatomic, retain) SomeClass *someVars;
@end


@implementation MyClass

@synthesize someVar;

- (void)someMethods {
}
@end

The protocol is optional of course. I believe this also makes all your instance variables private though I'm not 100% certain. For me it's just an interface to my static library so it doesn't really matter.

Anyway, I hope this helps you out. To anyone else reading this, do let me know if this is bad in general or has any unforeseen consequences. I'm pretty new to Obj-C myself so I could always use the advice of the experienced.

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I don't think the following code written in another answer is working as expected. The "SomeClass *someVars" defined in the extension class is not an instance variable of MyClass. I think it is a C global variable. If you synthesize someVars, you will get compile error. And self.someVars won't work either.

myLib.h

@interface MyClass : SomeSuperClass <SomeProtocol> {
    // Nothing in here
}

- (void)someMethods;
@end

myLib.m

@interface MyClass () 
    SomeClass *someVars;

    @property (nonatomic, retain) SomeClass *someVars;
@end

@implementation MyClass

@synthesize someVar;

- (void)someMethods {
}
@end
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