Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Solution properties, I have Configuration set to "release" for my one and only project.

At the beginning of the main routine, I have this code, and it is showing "Mode=Debug". I also have these two lines at the very top:

#define DEBUG 
#define RELEASE

Am I testing the right variable?

#if (DEBUG)
            Console.WriteLine("Mode=Debug"); 
#elif (RELEASE)
            Console.WriteLine("Mode=Release"); 
#endif

My goal is to set different defaults for variables based on debug vs release mode.

share|improve this question
6  
You are defining BOTH debug and release. –  Eric Dahlvang Jan 20 '10 at 19:05

10 Answers 10

up vote 212 down vote accepted

Remove the #define DEBUG in your code. Set preprocessors in the build configuration for that specific build (DEBUG/_DEBUG should be defined in VS already).

The reason it prints "Mode=Debug" is because of your #define and then skips the elif.

Also, the right way to check is:

#if DEBUG
    Console.WriteLine("Mode=Debug"); 
#else
    Console.WriteLine("Mode=Release"); 
#endif

Don't check for RELEASE

share|improve this answer
29  
I wanted to add that if one only wanted to check for RELEASE then one can do this: #if !DEBUG –  Inge Henriksen Mar 3 '12 at 9:44
1  
Why #if and not #ifdef? –  BobStein-VisiBone May 29 at 14:04
3  
@BobStein-VisiBone Remember we are talking about C# here, not C. #ifdef is specific to the preprocessor of C/C++, C# mandates the use of #if. –  jduncanator Jul 9 at 11:41

By default, Visual Studio defines DEBUG if project is compiled in Debug mode and doesn't define it if it's in Release mode. RELEASE is not defined in Release mode by default. Use something like this:

#if DEBUG
  // debug stuff goes here
#else
  // release stuff goes here
#endif

If you want to do something only in release mode:

#if !DEBUG
  // release...
#endif

Also, it's worth pointing out that you can use [Conditional("DEBUG")] attribute on methods that return void to have them only executed if a certain symbol is defined. The compiler would remove all calls to those methods if the symbol is not defined:

[Conditional("DEBUG")]
void PrintLog() {
    Console.WriteLine("Debug info");
}

void Test() {
    PrintLog();
}
share|improve this answer

I prefer checking it like this vs looking for #defines:

if (System.Diagnostics.Debugger.IsAttached)
{
   //...
}
else
{
   //...
}

With the caveat that of course you could compile and deploy something in debug mode but still not have the debugger attached.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I don't yet even know what "#defines" are so this is a great solution! –  Tim Feb 8 '12 at 10:29
    
This is a nice solution, thanks! –  yenta Jul 4 '13 at 8:01
    
And im my case, this does exactly what I want. I actually want to know if I have a debugger attached, because I know I have some code I do not want executed if I have a debugger attached. This is awesome! –  JFTxJ Aug 13 '13 at 15:01
    
If personally like using #IF DEBUG in situation of debugging code that shouldn't last. For production code I agree with using the above. –  CodeBlend Nov 20 '13 at 12:59

I'm not a huge fan of the #if stuff, especially if you spread it all around your code base as it will give you problems where Debug builds pass but Release builds fail if you're not careful.

So here's what I have come up with (inspired by #ifdef in C#):

public interface IDebuggingService
{
    bool RunningInDebugMode();
}

public class DebuggingService : IDebuggingService
{
    private bool debugging;

    public bool RunningInDebugMode()
    {
        //#if DEBUG
        //return true;
        //#else
        //return false;
        //#endif
        WellAreWe();
        return debugging;
    }

    [Conditional("DEBUG")]
    private void WellAreWe()
    {
        debugging = true;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Hey now, that's pretty creative. I like your use of the attribute to set the property. –  radium Mar 30 '13 at 0:45
2  
This has the advantage of not getting hit by refactoring bugs in Resharper that can mess up your code based on the current conditional setup. –  Jafin Apr 1 '13 at 23:45

If you are trying to use the variable defined for the build type you should remove the two lines ...

#define DEBUG  
#define RELEASE 

... these will cause the #if (DEBUG) to always be true.

Also there isn't a default Conditional compilation symbol for RELEASE. If you want to define one go to the project properties, click on the Build tab and then add RELEASE to the Conditional compilation symbols text box under the General heading.

The other option would be to do this...

#if DEBUG
    Console.WriteLine("Debug");
#else
    Console.WriteLine("Release");
#endif
share|improve this answer

Remove your defines at the top

#if DEBUG
        Console.WriteLine("Mode=Debug"); 
#else
        Console.WriteLine("Mode=Release"); 
#endif
share|improve this answer

NameSpace

using System.Resources;
using System.Diagnostics;

Method

   private static bool IsDebug()
    {
        object[] customAttributes = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DebuggableAttribute), false);
        if ((customAttributes != null) && (customAttributes.Length == 1))
        {
            DebuggableAttribute attribute = customAttributes[0] as DebuggableAttribute;
            return (attribute.IsJITOptimizerDisabled && attribute.IsJITTrackingEnabled);
        }
        return false;
    }
share|improve this answer

If conditional compilation is not desirable, one may use

bool isDebug = false;
Debug.Assert(isDebug = true); // not '=='

When DEBUG is not defined, Debug.Assert's parameter evaluation is eliminated.

share|improve this answer

Slightly modified (bastardized?) version of the answer by Tod Thomson as a static function rather than a separate class (I wanted to be able to call it in a WebForm viewbinding from a viewutils class I already had included).

public static bool isDebugging() {
    bool debugging = false;

    WellAreWe(ref debugging);

    return debugging;
}

[Conditional("DEBUG")]
private static void WellAreWe(ref bool debugging)
{
    debugging = true;
}
share|improve this answer

Since the purpose of these COMPILER directives are to tell the compiler NOT to include code, debug code,beta code, or perhaps code that is needed by all of your end users, except say those the advertising department, i.e. #Define AdDept you want to be able include or remove them based on your needs. Without having to change your source code if for example a non AdDept merges into the AdDept. Then all that needs to be done is to include the #AdDept directive in the compiler options properties page of an existing version of the program and do a compile and wa la! the merged program's code springs alive!.

You might also want to use a declarative for a new process that is not ready for prime time or that can not be active in the code until it's time to release it.

Anyhow, that's the way I do it.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.