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I'm dying here, trying to implement a generic repository with my unit of work. This will work well with the specific project I'm working on. But I just can't grasp the right syntax. If I could only get the below to work as a starting point...

I would like to be able to do a

unit_of_work.Repository<don't-know-until-runtime>().Insert(run-time-object);

where I won't know until at runtime what kind of object I will be dealing with, I only know it will be of type 'BaseClass'.

Much appreciate your help. I've tried to boil the code down, below.

public class BaseClass
{
}

public class SubClass1 : BaseClass
{
    public SubClass1()
        : base()
    {
    }
}

public interface IRepository<TEntity> where TEntity : class
{
    void Insert(TEntity entity);
}


public class Repository<TEntity> : IRepository<TEntity> where TEntity : class
{
    public void Insert(TEntity entity)
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("got here!!");
    }
}

public class UnitOfWork
{
    public virtual IRepository<TEntity> Repository<TEntity>() where TEntity : class
    {
        var type = typeof(TEntity).Name;
        var repositoryType = typeof(Repository<>);

        return (IRepository<TEntity>) Activator.CreateInstance(repositoryType.MakeGenericType(typeof(TEntity)));
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        UnitOfWork unit_of_work = new UnitOfWork();

        SubClass1 testClass1 = new SubClass1();

        // this works fine, when I know the type in advance...
        unit_of_work.Repository<SubClass1>().Insert(testClass1);

        // ... but when I don't know the type, then what?
        // (All I know is that the incoming object will be of type BaseClass)
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
is this c++? can you please tag the question with the language? –  Bohemian Jan 10 at 11:11
    
@Bohemian I can and I have,thanks. –  Morten Nørgaard Jan 10 at 11:13
    
I usually find that when someone goes "I won't know the type here", then there's something else in the design that is wrong. Note I said usually. –  Moo-Juice Jan 10 at 11:15
    
@Moo-Juice Let's hope that's not the case here :-). I encourage you to treat the question as a theoretical exercise - it would certainly be of great help if you could crack it where I can't :) –  Morten Nørgaard Jan 10 at 11:20
    
@MortenNørgaard, I guess it depends on what happens within Insert. If we know that it will be of type BaseClass... what is happening? If you're inserting in to the database based on properties, you could use reflection to enumerate the public properties to construct your insert statement. If you're doing something more esoteric... :) –  Moo-Juice Jan 10 at 11:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Just declare your repository and UoW method with the necessary type constraint for BaseClass:

public interface IRepository<TEntity> where TEntity : BaseClass
...
public class Repository<TEntity> : IRepository<TEntity> where TEntity : BaseClass
...
public virtual IRepository<TEntity> Repository<TEntity>() where TEntity : BaseClass

and then you can do that:

unit_of_work.Repository<BaseClass>().Insert(<whatever>);

This works because of generic contravariance.

share|improve this answer
    
That works great - thanks. Just one thing, though: let's say I need a TEntity FindById(object id)-method in my repository - how should the repository be instantiated if I needed to find a SubClass1 object, but would only know this at runtime? If, for example, the SubClass1 object came courtesy of an FindObject(BaseClass objectToFind)-method. –  Morten Nørgaard Jan 10 at 11:53

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