Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I can't seem to make random prime numbers using this code, please can someone help me?

def RandomPrime():
  prime = False
  while prime == False:
    n = random.randint(10000, 100000)
    if n % 2 != 0:
      for x in range(3, int(n**0.5), 2):
        if n % x ==0:
          prime = False
        else:
          prime = True


  return n
share|improve this question
    
On each iteration of the for loop, you're ignoring what the earlier iterations told you by setting prime = False or prime = True without considering what prime used to be. –  user2357112 Jan 10 at 11:29

4 Answers 4

Imagine what happens if the last number in range(3, int(n**0.5), 2) is not an integer divisor of n:

if n % x ==0:
    prime = False # not this
else:
    prime = True # this

So even if all previous checks evaluated False, you call n a prime. The minimal change to your code to fix this is:

prime = prime and True # or 'prime &= True'

So if prime is already False, it remains False.

However, bear in mind that, for primality, if any of those checks is False n is not prime. You can use this and Python's and and all (which are evaluated lazily, i.e. don't keep checking once finding a False) to implement much more efficiently:

def rand_prime():
    while True:
        p = randint(10000, 100000)
        if (r % 2 != 0 and
            all(p % n != 0 for n in range(3, int(((p ** 0.5) + 1), 2))):
            return p

For even better performance, note that randrange incorporates a step argument, just like range, so you can skip all of the even numbers (which definitely aren't prime!):

def rand_prime():
    while True:
        p = randrange(10001, 100000, 2)
        if all(p % n != 0 for n in range(3, int((p ** 0.5) + 1), 2)):
            return p

Note: sqrt(n) (from math) is, in my opinion, a little clearer to other, less-technical readers than n ** 0.5 (although it may or may not be more efficient).

share|improve this answer
    
very nice answer. helpful –  Grijesh Chauhan Jan 10 at 13:04

Correct logic, you are setting True when n % x ! = 0 for first time:

  for x in range(3, int(n**0.5), 2):
    if n % x ==0:
      prime = False
    else:
      prime = True

should be:

  prime = False
  for x in range(3, int(n**0.5), 2):
    if n % x ==0:
      break
  else: 
    prime = True

Read break and continue Statements, and else Clauses on Loops.

The shorter way of writing equivalent code will be (from @Steve Jesso):

prime = all(n % x != 0 for x in range(3, int(n**0.5), 2)
share|improve this answer
    
The OP only wants to return once a prime is found, not return False - it should loop to a new random number. –  jonrsharpe Jan 10 at 11:26
    
@jonrsharpe I confused ...so please check again ... –  Grijesh Chauhan Jan 10 at 11:29
    
The else of a for loop executes if the loop doesn't break, so you should set prime = True in there. But actually you can replace the whole thing with prime = all(n % x != 0 for x in range(3, int(n**0.5), 2). –  Steve Jessop Jan 10 at 11:43
    
@SteveJessop Yes I corrected. also added your suggestion Thanks! –  Grijesh Chauhan Jan 10 at 12:58

There're errors in your code:

  1. Incorrect "else:"; you can't declare number being prime if a remainder is not 0; All the remaiders should be non-zeros
  2. int(n*0.5) should be int(n*0.5 + 1) to prevent round-up errors

The possible solution is

def RandomPrime():
  while True:
    n = random.randint(10000, 100000)

    if n % 2 == 0:
      continue;

    prime = True;

    for x in range(3, int(n**0.5 + 1), 2):
      if n % x == 0:
        prime = False;

        break; 

    if prime: 
      return n
share|improve this answer

Take a look to the tabs: The else should refer to the whole for loop, not to the iF

def RandomPrime():
  prime = False
  while prime == False:
    n = random.randint(10000, 100000)
    if n % 2 != 0:
      for x in range(3, int(n**0.5), 2):
        if n % x ==0:
          break
      else:
          prime = True


  return n
share|improve this answer
    
Considering that the loop doesn't even have a break in it, this is not a correct answer. –  user2357112 Jan 10 at 11:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.