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I'm testing the byte order by sending a single frame (160x120) from LabVIEW to this C-program through TCP. I managed to convert the bytes to uint32 pixel values, but the problem is that the loop repeats printing the received data in the console application. The point here is that, I will print the received 19200(160x120) uint32 values and stop the printing at that value so I can examine the pixel values of the frame. Is that possible ?. The code: (I have tried to change the "len" to "160*120" in the for loop, but I got some weird values in the console).

int main(int argc , char *argv[])
{
WSADATA wsa;
SOCKET s , new_socket;
struct sockaddr_in server , client;
int c;
int iResult;
int receivedCount = 0;
char recvbuf[DEFAULT_BUFLEN];
int recvbuflen = DEFAULT_BUFLEN;
typedef unsigned int uint8_t;
unsigned int i;
size_t len;
uint8_t* p;
uint8_t value;

p = (uint8_t*)((void*)recvbuf);

do
{
  iResult = recv( new_socket, recvbuf, recvbuflen, 0);
  len = iResult/sizeof(uint8_t);

  for(i=0; i<len; i++)
    {
    value = p[i];
    printf("%lu\n",value);  
    }
}
while( iResult > 0 );

closesocket(new_socket);
WSACleanup();
}   
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Maybe my C is rusty, but why the double cast p = (uint8_t*)((void*)recvbuf);? It seems to me that you could skip the extra cast here... Also, is it possible that your data is broken up into multiple packets due to the size? 19200*sizeof(uint8_t) seems like a lot of data to be expected to fit in a single packet –  abiessu Jan 10 at 15:43
    
The data is received as a stream of bytes. What do you actually mean by skipping the extra cast ?. –  Osman Esen Jan 10 at 16:11
    
I just mean that you might write p = (uint8_t*)recvbuf; directly. I know that the data is received as a stream of bytes, but I'm wondering if perhaps the stream is really a set of streams rather than just one; i.e., you might check how many times you get iResult>0 because I suspect it will be more than one for the given data set. –  abiessu Jan 10 at 16:20
    
I placed a breakpoint on that line, and the program detects the breakpoint. When I press continue to run, it then detects it afterwards and printing new pixel values in the console. So you were right I think. The data might be broken in multiple packets. –  Osman Esen Jan 10 at 17:47
    
So then to answer your question, it would be a good idea to put an overallUintsRecieved variable that is incremented just after value=p[i]; and gives you an indicator when overallUintsRecieved > 160*120. And now you know why using for (i=0; i< 160*120; i++)... gives you bad data: you are reading beyond the end of the currently-read data packet and into uninitialized data. –  abiessu Jan 10 at 18:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To coalesce my comments, here is how I would rewrite your code:

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  WSADATA wsa;
  SOCKET s, new_socket;
  struct sockaddr_in server, client;
  int c, iResult, receivedCount = 0;
  unsigned long totalReceived = 0, totalExpected=160*120;
  char recvbuf[DEFAULT_BUFLEN];
  int recvbuflen = DEFAULT_BUFLEN;
  typedef unsigned int uint8_t;
  uint8_t i, value;
  size_t len;
  uint8_t* p;

  p = (uint8_t*)recvbuf;

  do {
    iResult = recv(new_socket, recvbuf, recvbuflen, 0);
    len = iResult/sizeof(uint8_t);

    for (i=0; i<len; i++) {
      value = p[i];
      totalReceived++;
      printf("%lu\n", value);
      if (totalReceived >= totalExpected) {
        printf("Retrieved expected data\n");
      }
    }
  } while (iResult > 0);

  if (totalReceived < totalExpected) {
    printf("Received less than expected: %lu < %lu\n", totalReceived, totalExpected);
  }

  closesocket(new_socket);
  WSACleanup();
}

This covers "double casting" changes, and capturing a data received count across multiple recv calls.

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