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I have something like this

void my_very_large_function(void){
   struct A *sA;
   < a lot of references to *sA structure in many many lines >
}

and now I want to use also another type of structure depending on the argument passed to the function, but I dont want to check that argument in every reference I do.

void my_very_large_function(int type){
   struct A *sA;
   struct B *sB;
   if(type == 0)  // I dont want this because there are too many references
      <use *sA>
   else
      <use *sB>
}

Is there a way to set the pointer type in the beginning of the function?

Using void pointers is not ok because I would have to be casting every time I use it and also would need to check the argument in order to decide how to cast (to A or to B).

void my_very_large_function(int type){
   struct A *sA;
   struct B *sB;
   void *ptr;
   if(type == 0)  
      ptr = (struct A *) *sA;  // is there a way in C to make this cast permanent? I think not
   else
      ptr = (struct B *) *sB;
   < now use just ptr >
}

I think I could use a union if one structure would be embedded in the begining of the other, but the structures are not similar

share|improve this question
1  
If the structures are not similar, how is this even going to work in the first place? Or do you mean you have fields of the same name, just in different places? –  tabstop Jan 10 at 16:16
    
Please explain much more what my_very_large_function is doing and why is it so large!!!! Can't you split it up into smaller (perhaps inlined) functions? What are struct A and struct B concretely? What relation between them??? Show much more code please! –  Basile Starynkevitch Jan 10 at 16:18
    
maybe some usage of void *? –  zoska Jan 10 at 16:27
    
It is a general C question. In my case I wrote a function to read and parse a pcap file. Now I want to change it to be able to parse other capture format I made that is similar but not equal to pcap (mainly the packet header include more fields). So, in order to read each packet I need to know which structure to use, the standard pcap packet header or the new one. Right now I have splited it into two different functions that do almost the same (only reading change) and I was thinking about how to merge it in a elegant way –  user206551 Jan 10 at 16:51

1 Answer 1

In C this is not possible. In C++ you can do this with templates, still will be a mess. The reason why this is not possible in C is because all structure member offsets have to be known at compile time.

Example:

struct A {
    int a;
    int b;
};

struct B {
    int b;
    int a;
};

are incompatible to be exchanged even if you can compile a function for either. Your only way is to compile two functions one for each type:

void my_very_large_function_A();
void my_very_large_function_B();

void my_very_large_function(int type){
   if(type == 0)  
      my_very_large_function_A();
   else
      my_very_large_function_B();
}

You can do this semi-automated with preprocessor macros:

my_very_large_function.c:

#ifdef structtype
void NAME(my_very_large_function, structtype)() {
    struct structtype *my_struct;
    // whatever it does
}
#endif

main.c:

#define PASTER(x,y) x ## _ ## y
#define EVALUATOR(x,y)  PASTER(x,y)
#define NAME(fun, type) EVALUATOR(fun, type)

#define structtype A
#include <my_very_large_function.c>
#define structtype B
#include <my_very_large_function.c>


void my_very_large_function(int type){
   if(type == 0)  
      my_very_large_function_A();
   else
      my_very_large_function_B();
}
share|improve this answer
    
That is what I am doing, split it into two different functions. thanks Sergey for the answer, very complete and useful (I can not vote it since I have not enough reputation yet!). –  user206551 Jan 13 at 11:00
    
@user206551, you can certainly accept the answer to your own question. –  vonbrand Jan 29 at 17:42

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