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My script constructs variables into a given order depending on a table to be printed. But if there are any spaces in the end string, printf treats it as a separate column. Imagine the following:

one=1
two="2 3"
all="$one $two"
format="%5s%5s"
printf $format $all

How can the printf command understand the variables passed in $all properly? I know they are being expanded and that printf is seeing it just as a single string, but I can't find a way to get it to work where there are spaces in a variable like there are in $four.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It can't, as written. You can't selectively treat some spaces as word splitting and others as not in a parameter expansion. You can, however, use an array to preserve the non-word-splitting spaces.

one=1
two="2 3"
all=( "$one" "$two" )
format="%5s%5s"
printf "$format" "${all[@]}"
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Thanks. I forgot to mention that ultimately, $all is constructed in a for loop, i.e: all=$all$var so is there a way to define $all as an array either before of after the loop? –  delronhubbard Jan 10 '14 at 18:14
    
all=() to initialize, then all+=( "$var" ) is the equivalent of all=$all$var. –  chepner Jan 10 '14 at 18:54
    
Funny...In TPL (custom application language), these would be lists which for some strange reason I have not come across before for bash scripting but perfect for my uses. I will give this a run when my system decides to come back up. –  delronhubbard Jan 11 '14 at 18:40

You should store the two values in an array rather than a string.

one=1
two="2 3"
all=("$one" "$two") # array with 2 elements
format="%5s%5s"
printf "$format" "${all[@]}" # quoting the array expansion properly passes two args
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