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#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
int x = 42;
cout << x; // This line doesn't print! Why?
    return 0;
}

Screenshot of Visual C++: http://bildr.no/image/ZlVBV0k0.jpeg

This code gives me nothing but a black console window that flashes by when I click on debug. Isn't the number 42 supposed to be printed in the console window? This is my first application in C++. I have experience in C# from high school.

EDIT:

Now I have tried this code:

// Primtallsgenerator.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
int x = 42;
cout << x << endl; // This line doesn't print! Why?
cin >> x;
    return 0;
}

It still doesn't work. Screenshot of the code here: http://bildr.no/image/ODNRc3lG.jpeg

The black windows still just flashes by...

share|improve this question
1  
and with cout << x << flush; or cout << x << endl; ? –  ThePluc Jan 10 '14 at 18:44
    
@ThePluc That shouldn't be necessary. The destructors call flush(). –  0x499602D2 Jan 10 '14 at 18:45
    
Right click your project -> Configuration Properties -> Linker -> System -> SubSystem -> Console –  ManuelH Jan 10 '14 at 18:46
    
@0x499602D2 Yeah, the flush was useless. I assume it's a console issue, I thought the newline could help. This definitly works on a linux terminal but might be hard to read ^^ –  ThePluc Jan 10 '14 at 18:47
    
Run the program outside of the debugger (Ctrl-F5). In that mode the console window will prompt you to close it. I'm not sure why it doesn't do so when the debugger is used - I guess they figure you can get similar behavior in the debugger by setting a breakpoint on the return from main(). –  Michael Burr Jan 10 '14 at 18:48

4 Answers 4

It did print the message, it was just too fast for you to see.

add this command:

cin >> x;

or this one

while(true) {}

before the return statement.

share|improve this answer
    
That last one's an infinite loop. How about just std::cin.get(). –  0x499602D2 Jan 10 '14 at 18:46
    
How about this one: cin.ignore(100000, '\n'); –  Thomas Matthews Jan 10 '14 at 18:51

Yes, it will print the number. Then the program ends, and the console window is closed. Run it in the debugger, and put a breakpoint on the return 0; line. Then you'll see it.

share|improve this answer
    
I've tried that know. You can see the screenshot in my edited OP. The black console window still just flashes by, even with the breakpoint. –  user3183044 Jan 11 '14 at 3:32

Two things to note:

First, you are not forcing the buffer to flush, so there is no guarantee the output is being sent to the screen before the program ends. Change your cout statement to:

cout << x << endl;

Second, Visual Studio will close the console when it ends (in Debugging mode). If you do not debug it (Ctrl-F5 by default), it will keep the console open until you press a key. This will allow you to see the output. Alternatively, you can add a cin.get() before your return statement which will force the program to wait for a character to be in the input stream before the program is allowed to exit.

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This code should work fine:

#include <iostream>
#include <stdio.h>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int x = 42;
    cout << x; 

    getchar();
    return 0;
}

Also check this documentation about getchar().

share|improve this answer
    
It still just flashes by! I feel like an idiot now, but no code samples from any of my books work neither. Something is wrong >:[ –  user3183044 Jan 11 '14 at 3:31

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