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I have a two servlets in my application and I want an object of class A to be injected to both the servlets, and I would also like the same ApplicationContext throughout the application i.e. both servlets as mentioned in the first answer of this question on SO: Spring injection Into Servlet

Now I went through many questions like these but couldnt find something exactly that matches my question. To explain better Ill write a rough code here:

public class servletOne extends HttpServlet {
protected void processRequest(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response)
            throws ServletException, IOException {

    }
}

public class servletTwo extends HttpServlet {
protected void processRequest(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response)
            throws ServletException, IOException {

    }
}

So above are the two servelts now in applicationContext.xml I want to pass an object to both these servlets so as per normal convention I want a functionality like this:

<bean id="servletFirst" class="mypackage.servletOne">
        <property name="message" ref="classObject" />


</bean>
<bean id="servletFirst" class="mypackage.servletTwo">
        <property name="message" ref="classObject" />


</bean>

<bean id="classObject" class="mypackage.classA">

    </bean>

I dont know if this is possible or not, I am new to spring and I have only basic knowledge of dependency Injection.

If anyone can help me with this I would really really appreciate it. This would clear a lot of my doubts and help me move forward in the process of learning Spring.

This is web.xml

    <context-param>
        <param-name>contextConfigLocation</param-name>
        <param-value>/WEB-INF/applicationContext.xml</param-value>
    </context-param>
    <listener>
        <listener-class>org.springframework.web.context.ContextLoaderListener</listener-class>
    </listener>
    <servlet>
        <servlet-name>dispatcher</servlet-name>
        <servlet-class>org.springframework.web.servlet.DispatcherServlet</servlet-class>
        <load-on-startup>2</load-on-startup>
    </servlet>
    <servlet>
        <servlet-name>servletOne</servlet-name>
        <servlet-class>mypackage.servletOne</servlet-class>
    </servlet>
<servlet>
        <servlet-name>servletTwo</servlet-name>
        <servlet-class>mypackage.servletTwo</servlet-class>
    </servlet>
    <servlet-mapping>
        <servlet-name>dispatcher</servlet-name>
        <url-pattern>*.htm</url-pattern>
    </servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-mapping>
        <servlet-name>servletOne</servlet-name>
        <url-pattern>/servletOne</url-pattern>
    </servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-mapping>
        <servlet-name>servletTwo</servlet-name>
        <url-pattern>/servletTwo</url-pattern>
    </servlet-mapping>

    <session-config>
        <session-timeout>
            300
        </session-timeout>
    </session-config>
</web-app>
share|improve this question
    
It depends on how you are registering your Servlet beans with the Servlet container. – Sotirios Delimanolis Jan 10 '14 at 20:43
    
@SotiriosDelimanolis Could you please elaborate a little bit, i did not understand exactly what you are asking, is there any file or code that I can post that would clear your doubt? – Nick Div Jan 10 '14 at 20:48
    
You have two beans that extend the HttpServlet class. How are you using (or planning to use) those two beans? – Sotirios Delimanolis Jan 10 '14 at 20:52
    
@SotiriosDelimanolis I see that the answer that I have mentioned in my question is given by you only, but I dont where to write the code that you have posted in your answer because as i said i am new to spring and I would like the approach that you mentioned "Now all your servlets have access to the same ApplicationContext through the ServletContext attributes." but dont know how to pass the object and how to get same applicationContext throughout the application. – Nick Div Jan 10 '14 at 20:52
    
@SotiriosDelimanolis they are basically servlets so they will called from browser from an HTML page, I mean that is how I intend to call them – Nick Div Jan 10 '14 at 20:53
up vote 9 down vote accepted

You're mixing up two concepts: Servlets and Spring's ApplicationContext. Servlets are managed by your Servlet container, let's take Tomcat for example. The ApplicationContext is managed by Spring.

When you declare a Servlet in your deployment descriptor as

<servlet>
    <servlet-name>servletOne</servlet-name>
    <servlet-class>mypackage.servletOne</servlet-class>
</servlet>
<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>servletOne</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/servletOne</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>

The Servlet container will create an instance of your mypackage.servletOne class, register it, and use it to handle requests. This is what it does with the DispatcherServlet which is the basis of Spring MVC.

Spring is an IoC container that uses ApplicationContext to manage a number of beans. The ContextLoaderListener loads the root ApplicationContext (from whatever location you tell it to). The DispatcherServlet uses that root context and must also load its own. The context must have the appropriate configuration for the DispatcherServlet to work.

Declaring a bean in the Spring context, like

<bean id="servletFirst" class="mypackage.servletOne">
        <property name="message" ref="classObject" />
</bean>

regardless of the fact that it is of the same type as the <servlet> declared in web.xml, is completely unrelated. The bean above has nothing to do with the <servlet> declaration in the web.xml.

As in my answer here, because the ContextLoaderListener puts the ApplicationContext it creates into the ServletContext as an attribute, that ApplicationContext is available to any Servlet container managed object. As such, you can override the HttpServlet#init(ServletConfig) in your custom HttpServlet classes, like so

@Override
public void init(ServletConfig config) throws ServletException {
   super.init(config);

   ApplicationContext ac = (ApplicationContext) config.getServletContext().getAttribute(WebApplicationContext.ROOT_WEB_APPLICATION_CONTEXT_ATTRIBUTE);

   this.someObject = (SomeBean)ac.getBean("someBeanRef");
}

assuming that your root ApplicationContext contains a bean called someBeanRef.

There are other alternatives to this. This, for example.

share|improve this answer
    
Now i understand that servlets cannot be instantiated the way i wrote it in ApplicationContext.xml, cool. I get that its the servlet container's responsibility to create their instance but I couldnt totally unserstand the second half of the answer. Why is applicationContext.xml declared in web.xml etc. basically first 14 lines in my web.xml – Nick Div Jan 10 '14 at 21:28
1  
@kapil I didn't say ApplicationContext is declared in web.xml. I said that beans in the application context are (typically) unrelated to anything in the web.xml – Sotirios Delimanolis Jan 10 '14 at 21:30
1  
@kapilchhattani Consider looking into HttpRequestHandlerServlet. – Sotirios Delimanolis Jan 10 '14 at 21:39
1  
@kapil In this case, you don't need to do that. The ServletContextListener is an interface that the Servlet container uses to initialize to ServletContext. The ContextLoaderListener is an implementation of that interface which already sets the ApplicationContext as an attribute in the ServletContext. It uses the key referenced by WebApplicationContext.ROOT_WEB_APPLICATION_CONTEXT_ATTRIBUTE, which you can use to retrieve it. – Sotirios Delimanolis Jan 10 '14 at 21:46
1  
@kapilchhattani It's just a static variable in the WebApplicationContext class. – Sotirios Delimanolis Jan 10 '14 at 21:54

If you want to use @Autowired or set property via applicationContext.xml then annotate your class with @Controller annotation

share|improve this answer
    
This does not help OP who is trying to register Servlet instances, not controllers. – Sotirios Delimanolis Jan 10 '14 at 21:03
    
@SotiriosDelimanolis huh? if you annotate your servlet with @Controller annotation you can do precisely what op whats to do (did you try it your self prior down vote?) – Алексей Jan 10 '14 at 21:10
    
@user1631616 even if it somehow worked it would be a terrible design flaw. A controller is a strategy object that serves a servlet, nott a servlet – Sean Patrick Floyd Jan 10 '14 at 21:13
    
Yes, but that won't have the behavior that OP wants at all. – Sotirios Delimanolis Jan 10 '14 at 21:13

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