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I am posting this as an question since I want to clarify with you guys on the concept of using F/J framework in Java 1.7 as I see some of the example on the internet does not seem to make sense.

The Code using a List instead of array is intentional.

Here is the linear/regular version of recursive merge sort.

package org.algorithms.sort;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.Comparator;
import java.util.List;


public class MergeSortor<T> {
    private final List<T> items;
    private final Comparator<T> c;

    public MergeSortor(final List<T> original, final Comparator<T> c) {
        if (original == null) {
            this.items = Collections.emptyList();
        } else {
            this.items = original;
        }
        this.c = c;
    }

    protected List<T> compute() {
        List<T> result = null;
        int currentSize = this.items.size();
        if (currentSize <= 1) {
            result = items;
        } else{
            int midPoint = currentSize / 2;
            List<T> left =new MergeSortor<T>(items.subList(0, midPoint), c).getSortedResult();
            List<T> right =new MergeSortor<T>(items.subList(midPoint,
                    currentSize), c).getSortedResult();
            result = merge(left,right);
        }
        return result;
    }
    private List<T> merge(List<T>left,List<T>right) {

        List<T> result = new ArrayList<T>(left.size()+right.size());
        T firstLeft = null;
        T firstRight = null;
        while (left.size() > 0 || right.size() > 0) {
            if (left.size() > 0 && right.size() > 0) {
                firstLeft = left.get(0);
                firstRight = right.get(0);
                if (c.compare(firstLeft, firstRight) <= 0) {
                    result.add(firstLeft);
                    left = left.subList(1, left.size());
                } else {
                    result.add(firstRight);
                    right = right.subList(1, right.size());
                }
            } else if (left.size() > 0){
                result.add(left.get(0));
                left = left.subList(1, left.size());
            } else if (right.size() > 0){
                result.add(right.get(0));
                right = right.subList(1, right.size());
            }
        }

        return result;
    }

    public List<T> getSortedResult() {
        return this.compute();
    }

    static public class IntegerComparator implements Comparator<Integer> {

        @Override
        public int compare(Integer o1, Integer o2) {
            int f = o1.hashCode(); // Auto-unboxing
            int s = o2.hashCode(); // Auto-unboxing
            return f < s ? -1 : (f == s ? 0 : 1); // No unboxing
        }
    }
}

And here is the F/J version of the merge sort extending The RecursiveTask.

package org.algorithms.sort;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.Comparator;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.concurrent.RecursiveTask;

public class MergeTask<T> extends RecursiveTask<List<T>>{
    private final List<T> items;
    private final Comparator<T> c;


    private static final long serialVersionUID = 8193108777395886772L;

    public MergeTask(final List<T> original, final Comparator<T> c){
        if (original == null) {
            this.items = Collections.emptyList();
        } else {
            this.items = original;
        }
        this.c = c;

    }

    @Override
    protected List<T> compute() {
        List<T> result = null;
        int currentSize = this.items.size();
        if (currentSize <= 1) {
            result = items;
        } else{
            int midPoint = currentSize / 2;
            MergeTask<T> leftSortor = new MergeTask<T>(items.subList(0, midPoint), c);
            MergeTask<T> rightSortor = new MergeTask<T>(items.subList(midPoint,
                    currentSize), c);

            rightSortor.fork(); 
            leftSortor.fork();
            result = merge(leftSortor.join(),rightSortor.join());
        }
        return result;
    }
    private List<T> merge(List<T>left,List<T>right) {

        List<T> result = new ArrayList<T>(left.size()+right.size());
        T firstLeft = null;
        T firstRight = null;
        while (left.size() > 0 || right.size() > 0) {
            if (left.size() > 0 && right.size() > 0) {
                firstLeft = left.get(0);
                firstRight = right.get(0);
                if (c.compare(firstLeft, firstRight) <= 0) {
                    result.add(firstLeft);
                    left = left.subList(1, left.size());
                } else {
                    result.add(firstRight);
                    right = right.subList(1, right.size());
                }
            } else if (left.size() > 0){
                result.add(left.get(0));
                left = left.subList(1, left.size());
            } else if (right.size() > 0){
                result.add(right.get(0));
                right = right.subList(1, right.size());
            }
        }

        return result;
    }

}

and here is the main program that calls them.

package org.algorithms.sort;

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Random;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutionException;
import java.util.concurrent.ForkJoinPool;

import org.algorithms.sort.MergeSortor.IntegerComparator;

    public class SortingRunner {

        public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException, ExecutionException {
            Integer[] initialOrders = new Integer[Short.MAX_VALUE*32];
            Random random = new Random();
            for (int i =0 ;i<Short.MAX_VALUE*32;i++){
                initialOrders[i]=Integer.valueOf(random.nextInt(Integer.MAX_VALUE));
            }
            MergeSortor<Integer> sortor = new MergeSortor<Integer>(
                    Arrays.asList(initialOrders), new IntegerComparator());

            ForkJoinPool pool = new ForkJoinPool();
            MergeTask<Integer> task = new MergeTask<Integer>(Arrays.asList(initialOrders), new IntegerComparator());


            long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
            sortor.getSortedResult();
            long end =  System.currentTimeMillis();
            System.out.println(end - start );


            start = System.currentTimeMillis();
            pool.invoke(task);
            end =  System.currentTimeMillis();
            System.out.println(end - start );
        }

    }

What I considered the problem on the internet is that the forking in most of the example is to fork both legs together of the dividing task or fork the left dividing part first then fork the right.

In the case of using F/J on merge sort, I think it should be a big no no.

Merge sort is actually linear dependent sorting from left to right. Forking left first does not generate any further parallel process that it is already there. F/J framework is putting everything your fork() in sequence of submission in a queue, then picked up and execute in the order of submission, separately by each worker thread of the F/J pool.

However, forking right first will give you the advantage of parallel computing of what should be execute later(comparing with the original/linear implementation) ahead of time and do the divide/merge of the tail first.

Let me know what you guys think. and hope this will be a good example for using F/J with sorting.

share|improve this question
    
The use of join() in Java7 usually results in a "continuation thread" being generated since the framework cannot do a context switch. This is one reason the example code does a left.fork() right.compute() left.join(). Your use of two forks/joins may slow things down considerably. –  edharned Jan 11 at 22:56
    
@edharned. Only agreeing with you half way there :) I have also tested that out as part of the experiments before coming to the current conclusion. and turns out both are about the same performance(left f/r c/l join win majority of time but not always) on the same pool size on the same testing list. So yes. it may be slower. but not considerably. and mainly I want to out point out the examples using also using 2 fork joins but left go first are wrong. see my paragraph right after the last snippet of the code –  user3183468 Jan 12 at 21:19
    
Look at the Java8 parallel sort. You can download the pre-release and pull out the source. Arrays.sort() is going to be one to use. Rolling your own is just not worth the effort. –  edharned Jan 13 at 14:27
    
@edharned, Thanks! will do for sure. This whole thing by no means to roll my own. I am not that smart :). Was just trying to learning the framework properly via examples. –  user3183468 Jan 13 at 15:55

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