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when I compile this code and I run it I get a result "PARENT" appears before the "CHILD". For information I'm on Linux Mint.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/types.h>

void main(){

pid_t pidc ;
pidc = fork();

if(pidc < 0)
{printf("error !\n");}

else if(pidc == 0){
        printf("I am the child process! \n");
            }
else{
        printf("I am the parent process! \n");
     }
}

and this is the Result:

I am the parent process!

I am the child process!

So, someone have an idea ? and thanks.

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4  
What exactly is your problem? You have stated what is happening but not what you expect or want to happen. –  LogicG8 Jan 10 at 21:57
1  
The parent and child processes run in parallel. That's the point of fork. If you want the messages to appear in some particular order, don't use fork; just print the messages from your program. Also, it's int main(void), not void main(); if you got void main() from a book, its author doesn't know C very well. Please identify the book so we can warn people away from it. –  Keith Thompson Jan 10 at 22:07
    
agree with you, but normally the CHILD should be displayed first, then the PARENT, and this is not the case! –  DARDAR SAAD Jan 10 at 22:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You may be confused because the child process's if condition occurs before the parent's if condition.

When you call fork(), your existing process will be cloned into a new process. The original process will receive a return value of the child's PID from the fork() call, the child will receive a PID of 0.

After the fork() succeeds, the two processes will be run in parallel, effectively. To run in parallel, processes are given small slices of time during which they execute, and at the end of the execution they are temporarily frozen while another process executes. You have no way of knowing which of the two processes will be schedule to execute first. Both the parent and the child process will execute the same code starting after the fork() call, but due to the difference in the value for pidc they will choose different branches of the if statement. Thus it is the first process that happens to be given a slice of execution time that will output first, the ordering of the if statement is not relevant.

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Once you've forked, the resulting two processes run largely independently. You don't get to assume the parent will run before the child (or vice versa) without adding some mechanism to force it to do so.

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It's called a race condition. You need to have a mechanism for synchronizing the two processes.

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I have only to add a 'wait(NULL)', thank you for all.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/types.h>

void main(){

pid_t pidc ;
pidc = fork();

if(pidc < 0)
{printf("error !\n");}

else if(pidc == 0){
        printf("I am the child process! \n");
            }
else{
       wait(NULL);
       printf("I am the parent process! \n");
     }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You still forgot to mention what you actually wanted to achieve in your question, although this answer makes it clear. –  0xC0000022L Jan 10 at 22:42

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