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I'm newbie with "Server-Side JS" and couldn't find a sample for long polling with node.js and Redis-Sub.

Following code works well but today I noticed RAM usage was 650MB and code was just up for 6 days.

var http     = require('http'),
    redis    = require('redis'),
    client   = redis.createClient();

client.subscribe("example");

http.createServer(function (req, res) {

    res.setHeader('Access-Control-Allow-Origin', 'https://mywebsite.com');
    res.setHeader('Access-Control-Allow-Methods', 'GET');
    res.setHeader('Access-Control-Allow-Headers', 'X-Requested-With,content-type');
    res.setHeader('Access-Control-Allow-Credentials', true);

    res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'application/json'});

    client.on("message", function (channel, message) {

        res.end( JSON.stringify( message ) );

    });

}).listen(8080);

Could someone please point the memory leakage and explain bit?

My node.js version is : v0.10.21

share|improve this question
    
The function function(req, res) is run every time the server receives a request. Each time it runs, a handler is set by client.on("message", ...). These handlers are not removed; therefore memory usage will increase every time a request is received. Not only that, but every time the redis client receives a message, the function function(channel, message) is run. Presumably it doesn't do anything if res has already been sent, but it may be that this would incur a significant overhead if there were many handlers. (In that case you'd see a delay in the handling of each request.) – David Knipe Jan 10 '14 at 22:59
    
checkout: book.mixu.net/node/ch3.html – bryanmac Jan 10 '14 at 22:59
    
What are you trying to do? I know roughly what I think it will do, and I can't see any logical reason for doing it. What is the connection between client requests and redis data? – David Knipe Jan 10 '14 at 23:01

The "memory leak" comes from the code client.on. You call it inside the request/response function. client.on is an emitter (see redis source, index.js:111 (as of todays npm installation)) and that defines the function on with

Adds a listener to the end of the listeners array for the specified event. (Nodejs-Docs: 1)

So you keep adding"message"-functions to the client. Move the client.on outside this request/response-"loop" and it should stop "leaking".

share|improve this answer

Something like the following is logically what you're looking for, so start here:

var http     = require('http'),
    redis    = require('redis'),
    client   = redis.createClient();

client.subscribe("example");

var responses = [];

client.on('message', function(channel, message) {
    var res;
    while (responses.length) {
        res = responses.pop();
        res.end(JSON.stringify(message));
    }
});

http.createServer(function (req, res) {

    res.setHeader('Access-Control-Allow-Origin', 'https://mywebsite.com');
    res.setHeader('Access-Control-Allow-Methods', 'GET');
    res.setHeader('Access-Control-Allow-Headers', 'X-Requested-With,content-type');
    res.setHeader('Access-Control-Allow-Credentials', true);

    res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'application/json'});

    responses.push(res);

}).listen(8080);

Your memory requirement will grow as you continue to receive requests that have not yet been satisfied with a message and end()ed, but aside from that there's not a whole lot going on here. Any true memory leaks would have to be brought in from the component module.

share|improve this answer

Right. I think I understand this now, but correct me if I'm wrong: The redis client sends out regular updates, which tell exactly what data is in it. (So if it never changes it will keep sending the same message forever at regular intervals.) With the current code, a client can send a request to your server, and receive an update of the content of the redis server. But the client will have to wait until the next time your server gets an update from redis.

The fact that the client has to wait feels wrong. I think it should send a response immediately with the last update that was received from redis. This should be possible with a bit of modification:

var http     = require('http'),
    redis    = require('redis'),
    client   = redis.createClient();

var lastMessage = null;

client.subscribe("example");

client.on("message", function (channel, message) {

    lastMessage = message

});

http.createServer(function (req, res) {

    res.setHeader('Access-Control-Allow-Origin', 'https://mywebsite.com');
    res.setHeader('Access-Control-Allow-Methods', 'GET');
    res.setHeader('Access-Control-Allow-Headers', 'X-Requested-With,content-type');
    res.setHeader('Access-Control-Allow-Credentials', true);

    res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'application/json'});

    res.end( JSON.stringify( lastMessage ) );

}).listen(8080);

And the above code also doesn't set the redis handler repeatedly, so it shouldn't leak memory.

The one disadvantage I can see is that if a client asks for an update before node has heard from redis, it will receive null. In this (probably unusual) case it may have been better to wait for redis before replying.

If this bothers you, you could replace the line res.end( JSON.stringify( lastMessage ) ); with something saying "if you've heard from redis already, then res.end( JSON.stringify( lastMessage ) );; otherwise, set a handler to do this when redis sends a message". The handler should be set to only run once, then be removed; you can probably do this by using .once instead of .on.

share|improve this answer
    
Redis subscribe works like, you are subscribing to channel and waiting for new messages. And the my code is waiting for new message with .on("message, function. When a new message comes it pushes and closes connection. – xecute Jan 11 '14 at 7:52
    
I thought so. But my point is: with your version of the code, a client that sends a request to your server will have to wait until the next time your server gets a message from redis. I assumed this wasn't what you wanted, so I rewrote it so that the server replies immediately with the previous message received from redis. But if I was wrong and you really did want to make the client wait, then ignore my answer and try just changing client.on("message", ... ) to client.once("message", ... ). Or if you wanted something else then please elaborate. – David Knipe Jan 11 '14 at 11:04
    
I load tested it with client.once and it's still increasing linearly(starting at 45MB, hitting to 80-85MB, after GC dropping to 50MB, and then hitting 90-95MB, after GC dropping to 60MB...). – xecute Jan 11 '14 at 15:39
    
Does your load test include messages from redis? If not, then I'd expect a memory leak, since the handlers are still not being removed. If it leaks memory even with redis messages and with .once then I have no explanation. But was I right when I said the client experiences delays while waiting for the server to get a redis message? Have you tried doing it the way I said in my answer? What happened? – David Knipe Jan 11 '14 at 17:39

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