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I am learning Clojure and in the process came across this example from the O'Reilly book, "Clojure Programming":

(let [tm (transient {})]
  (doseq [x (range 100)]
    (assoc! tm x 0))
  (persistent! tm))

It gives the result {0 0, 1 0, 2 0, 3 0, 4 0, 5 0, 6 0, 7 0}.

Also:

(let [tm (transient {})]
    (assoc! tm 0 0)
    (assoc! tm 1 0)
    (assoc! tm 2 0)
    (assoc! tm 3 0)
    (assoc! tm 4 0)
    (assoc! tm 5 0)
    (assoc! tm 6 0)
    (assoc! tm 7 0)
    (assoc! tm 8 0)
    (persistent! tm)
  )

gives the same result: {0 0, 1 0, 2 0, 3 0, 4 0, 5 0, 6 0, 7 0} .

Why do only the first eight items make it into the persistent collection?

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of What gotcha's exist when working with transient in Clojure 1.3? – amalloy Jan 10 '14 at 23:22
    
I don't think this is a duplicate question, though the answer to both is the same. – Ben Jan 10 '14 at 23:36
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Why only the first 8 items?

(type {})
;=> clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap
(type {0 0, 1 0, 2 0, 3 0, 4 0, 5 0, 6, 0})
;=> clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap
(type {0 0, 1 0, 2 0, 3 0, 4 0, 5 0, 6, 0, 7 0})
;=> clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap
(type {0 0, 1 0, 2 0, 3 0, 4 0, 5 0, 6, 0, 7 0, 8 0})
;=> clojure.lang.PersistentHashMap

Because the representation of maps changes between 8 and fewer pairs to 8 or more pairs. Since you are "bashing in place" on the original, you never captured the change in representation.

You must always capture and use the return values when working with transients.

share|improve this answer
    
There are some very explanatory links in Shepmaster's comment below: stackoverflow.com/questions/21056214/… Also, Ben winds up with a correct statement in his comment. – christopherbalz Jan 14 '14 at 22:58

How fascinating!

At first this looks like an issue with chunking of lazy seqs - to test, I modified your example slightly:

(let [tm (transient {})]
  (doseq [x (range 100)]
    (println "assoc! " x)
    (assoc! tm x 0))
  (persistent! tm))

To my surprise, this does indeed print 100 lines of text - but the resulting collection only contains 8 items, as you observe. I can't say why, exactly, other than it appears to be an artifact of the implementation of transients.

What I can say is that this is not idiomatic clojure. For the task of building up the map as specified, here's how I would do it:

(reduce (fn [m n] (assoc m n 0)) {} (range 100))

If this was actually a problem performance-wise, I might consider transients inside of a loop construct:

(loop [m (transient {})
       ns (range 100)]
  (if-let [n (first ns)]
    (recur (assoc! m n 0) (rest ns))
    (persistent! m))

The key issue you're facing is that, while transients are mutable, they are intended to be used in a somewhat-functional manner. If you treat a transient map the same as a persistent map - that is, keep the result of assoc! instead of assuming that one reference is always valid - you'll be fine.

share|improve this answer
2  
The key piece comes from the examples for assoc!: "transients are not meant to be bashed in place". There's also more description of why this happens. The short version is that the data representation might change at certain points. – Shepmaster Jan 11 '14 at 0:20

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