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I am looking for ways to speed up my code. I am looking into the apply/ply methods as well as data.table. Unfortunately, I am running into problems.

Here is a small sample data:

ids1   <- c(1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2)
ids2   <- c(1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4)
chars1 <- c("aa", " bb ", "__cc__", "dd  ", "__ee", NA,NA, "n/a")
chars2 <- c("vv", "_ ww_", "  xx  ", "yy__", "  zz", NA, "n/a", "n/a")
data   <- data.frame(col1 = ids1, col2 = ids2, 
                 col3 = chars1, col4 = chars2, 
          stringsAsFactors = FALSE)

Here is a solution using loops:

library("plyr")
cols_to_fix <- c("col3","col4")
for (i in 1:length(cols_to_fix)) {
  data[,cols_to_fix[i]] <- gsub("_", "", data[,cols_to_fix[i]])
  data[,cols_to_fix[i]] <- gsub(" ", "", data[,cols_to_fix[i]])
  data[,cols_to_fix[i]] <- ifelse(data[,cols_to_fix[i]]=="n/a", NA, data[,cols_to_fix[i]])
} 

I initially looked at ddply, but some methods I want to use only take vectors. Hence, I cannot figure out how to do ddply across just certain columns one-by-one.

Also, I have been looking at laply, but I want to return the original data.frame with the changes. Can anyone help me? Thank you.


Based on the suggestions from earlier, here is what I tried to use from the plyr package.

Option 1:

data[,cols_to_fix] <- aaply(data[,cols_to_fix],2, function(x){
   x <- gsub("_", "", x,perl=TRUE)
   x <- gsub(" ", "", x,perl=TRUE)
   x <- ifelse(x=="n/a", NA, x)
},.progress = "text",.drop = FALSE)

Option 2:

data[,cols_to_fix] <- alply(data[,cols_to_fix],2, function(x){
   x <- gsub("_", "", x,perl=TRUE)
   x <- gsub(" ", "", x,perl=TRUE)
   x <- ifelse(x=="n/a", NA, x)
},.progress = "text")

Option 3:

data[,cols_to_fix] <- adply(data[,cols_to_fix],2, function(x){
   x <- gsub("_", "", x,perl=TRUE)
   x <- gsub(" ", "", x,perl=TRUE)
   x <- ifelse(x=="n/a", NA, x)
},.progress = "text")

None of these are giving me the correct answer.

apply works great, but my data is very large and the progress bars from plyr package would be a very nice. Thanks again.

share|improve this question
2  
how big is "very large"? Could you provide a sample data corresponding to your real data dimensions? Progress bars are needed when an operation takes hours to finish. The only bottlenecks here are gsub and the numerous copies during assignment (the latter of which can be avoided by assignment by reference). Providing real data dimensions would definitely help. –  Arun Jan 11 at 2:15
    
@Arun progress bars are useful for tasks >5s because it helps you calibrate how long it will take. –  hadley Jan 14 at 14:39

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Here's a data.table solution using set.

require(data.table)
DT <- data.table(data)
for (j in cols_to_fix) {
    set(DT, i=NULL, j=j, value=gsub("[ _]", "", DT[[j]], perl=TRUE))
    set(DT, i=which(DT[[j]] == "n/a"), j=j, value=NA_character_)
}

DT
#    col1 col2 col3 col4
# 1:    1    1   aa   vv
# 2:    1    2   bb   ww
# 3:    1    3   cc   xx
# 4:    1    4   dd   yy
# 5:    2    1   ee   zz
# 6:    2    2   NA   NA
# 7:    2    3   NA   NA
# 8:    2    4   NA   NA

First line reads: set in DT for all i(=NULL), and column=j the value gsub(..).
Second line reads: set in DT where i(=condn) and column=j with value NA_character_.

Note: Using PCRE (perl=TRUE) has nice speed-up, especially on bigger vectors.

share|improve this answer

Here is a data.table solution, should be faster if your table is large. The concept of := is an "update" of the columns. I believe that because of this you aren't copying the table internally again as a "normal" dataframe solution would.

require(data.table)
DT <- data.table(data)

fxn = function(col) {
  col = gsub("[ _]", "", col, perl = TRUE)
  col[which(col == "n/a")] <- NA_character_
  col
}

cols = c("col3", "col4");

# lapply your function
DT[, (cols) := lapply(.SD, fxn), .SDcols = cols]
print(DT)
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 also checkout ?set. It avoids the [.data.table overhead and is therefore tad faster. Especially useful for looping through each column and updating values (by reference). –  Arun Jan 11 at 1:46
    
i've tried to use the set() function for this but could come up with a working answer. I haven't found an example where a function is applied to the value call inside set(). Please fell free to edit the answer. –  Martín Bel Jan 11 at 2:03
    
I wrote an answer earlier using set and then deleted it. I've undeleted it now. Since your real data, you say, is quite big, it might be quite fast. Let me know what you find (if you manage to benchmark all these answers). Hopefully it helps. –  Arun Jan 11 at 2:04
    
I see how it works now. This is actually not my question, but i found the use of set instructive anyway, thanks for the answer! –  Martín Bel Jan 11 at 2:12
    
Sure! Realised late that I wrote "your" instead of "OP's". Couldn't edit. –  Arun Jan 11 at 2:26

No need for loops (for or *ply):

tmp <- gsub("[_ ]", "", as.matrix(data[,cols_to_fix]), perl=TRUE)
tmp[tmp=="n/a"] <- NA
data[,cols_to_fix] <- tmp

Benchmarks

I only benchmark Arun's data.table solution and my matrix solution. I assume that many columns need to be fixed.

Benchmark code:

options(stringsAsFactors=FALSE)

set.seed(45)
K <- 1000; N <- 1e5
foo <- function(K) paste(sample(c(letters, "_", " "), 8, replace=TRUE), collapse="")
bar <- function(K) replicate(K, foo(), simplify=TRUE)
data <- data.frame(id1=sample(5, K, TRUE), 
                   id2=sample(5, K, TRUE)
)
data <- cbind(data, matrix(sample(bar(K), N, TRUE), ncol=N/K))

cols_to_fix <- as.character(seq_len(N/K))
library(data.table)

benchfun <- function() {
  time1 <- system.time({
    DT <- data.table(data)
    for (j in cols_to_fix) {
      set(DT, i=NULL, j=j, value=gsub("[ _]", "", DT[[j]], perl=TRUE))
      set(DT, i=which(DT[[j]] == "n/a"), j=j, value=NA_character_)
    }
  })

  data2 <- data
  time2 <- system.time({
    tmp <- gsub("[_ ]", "", as.matrix(data2[,cols_to_fix]), perl=TRUE)
    tmp[tmp=="n/a"] <- NA   
    data2[,cols_to_fix] <- tmp
  })

  list(identical= identical(as.data.frame(DT), data2),
       data.table_timing= time1[[3]],
       matrix_timing=time2[[3]])
}

replicate(3, benchfun())

Benchmark results:

#100 columns to fix, nrow=1e5
#                  [,1]   [,2]  [,3]  
#identical         TRUE   TRUE  TRUE  
#data.table_timing 6.001  5.571 5.602 
#matrix_timing     17.906 17.21 18.343

#1000 columns to fix, nrow=1e4
#                  [,1]   [,2]   [,3]  
#identical         TRUE   TRUE   TRUE  
#data.table_timing 4.509  4.574  4.857 
#matrix_timing     13.604 14.219 13.234

#1000 columns to fix, nrow=100
#                  [,1]  [,2]  [,3] 
#identical         TRUE  TRUE  TRUE 
#data.table_timing 0.052 0.052 0.055
#matrix_timing     0.134 0.128 0.127

#100 columns to fix, nrow=1e5 and including 
#data1 <- as.data.frame(DT) in the timing
#                           [,1]  [,2]  [,3]   [,4]   [,5]   [,6]   [,7]   [,8]   [,9]   [,10] 
#identical                  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE   TRUE   TRUE   TRUE   TRUE   TRUE   TRUE   TRUE  
#data.table_timing          5.642 5.58  5.762  5.382  5.419  5.633  5.508  5.578  5.634  5.397 
#data.table_returnDF_timing 5.973 5.808 5.817  5.705  5.736  5.841  5.759  5.833  5.689  5.669 
#matrix_timing              20.89 20.3  19.988 20.271 19.177 19.676 20.836 20.098 20.005 19.409

data.table is faster only by a factor of three. This advantage could probably be even smaller, if we decide to change the data structure (as the data.table solution does) and keep it a matrix.

share|improve this answer
    
I dint see that OP was dealing with big data. Here, there's a copy made during col subset, as.matrix, <-(tmp), <-(tmp) (2nd line) and <-(data) (last line). Probably quite costly.. I'm curious. I'll benchmark later if OP doesn't. –  Arun Jan 11 at 2:09
    
@Arun We might be able to reduce the number of copies if we don't insist on having a data.frame in the end. Also, I expected that data.table performs better, but the matrix solution performs quite well in comparison. –  Roland Jan 11 at 11:00
1  
when you time DT <- data.table(data) in your function, I'd expect you also time the final conversion to data.frame, since that's the desired output. The point is about the effect of making copies (and part of it comes from your conversion to matrix to leverage it's performance). So what's the point if the conversion takes too much time? That's more or less what I'd like to address. –  Arun Jan 11 at 11:18
    
Even then, when you change N to 1e7, DT takes 13 sec, and the matrix output takes 26 sec. That's just '2x'. But 'times' can be a bit misleading. Especially when it's in the order or many seconds/minutes. –  Arun Jan 11 at 11:20
    
@Arun No, I don't time as.data.frame(DT) since imho it would be stupid to turn a data.table back into an ordinary data.frame. I know that this simple benchmarking procedure is not optimal, but I think it's sufficient here. However, the conclusion is that data.table is faster than the base R solution, but not by an order of magnitude. –  Roland Jan 11 at 11:24

I think you can do this with regular old apply, which will call your cleanup function on each column (margin=2):

fxn = function(col) {
  col <- gsub("_", "", col)
  col <- gsub(" ", "", col)
  col <- ifelse(col=="n/a", NA, col)
  return(col)
}
data[,cols_to_fix] <- apply(data[,cols_to_fix], 2, fxn)
data
#   col1 col2 col3 col4
# 1    1    1   aa   vv
# 2    1    2   bb   ww
# 3    1    3   cc   xx
# 4    1    4   dd   yy
# 5    2    1   ee   zz
# 6    2    2 <NA> <NA>
# 7    2    3 <NA> <NA>
# 8    2    4 <NA> <NA>

Edit: it sounds like you're requiring the use of the plyr package. I'm not an expert in plyr, but this seemed to work:

library(plyr)
data[,cols_to_fix] <- t(laply(data[,cols_to_fix], fxn))
share|improve this answer
    
What about using one of the functions from the plyr package? It has some abilities (i.e., progress bars) that I really like. –  Brad Jan 10 at 23:48
    
I tried using aaply and alply, which are suppose to be similar to apply but I'm not getting the right answers. –  Brad Jan 10 at 23:49
    
@Brad edit your code with what you tried to do; hard to help otherwise. –  BrodieG Jan 10 at 23:51
    
Brodie, thanks for the suggestion. I put my revised code in the original post. Both @josilber and your suggestion works great but I cannot figure out the alternative with plyr. –  Brad Jan 11 at 0:17
    
@Brad I've updated my approach to use plyr –  josilber Jan 11 at 0:29

Here's a benchmark of all the different answers:

First, all the answers as separate functions:

1) Arun's

arun <- function(data, cols_to_fix) {
    DT <- data.table(data)
    for (j in cols_to_fix) {
        set(DT, i=NULL, j=j, value=gsub("[ _]", "", DT[[j]], perl=TRUE))
        set(DT, i=which(DT[[j]] == "n/a"), j=j, value=NA_character_)
    }
    return(DT)
}

2) Martin's

martin <- function(data, cols) {
    DT <- data.table(data)    
    colfun = function(col) {
        col <- gsub("_", "", col)
        col <- gsub(" ", "", col)
        col <- ifelse(col=="n/a", NA, col)
    }
    DT[, (cols) := lapply(.SD, colfun), .SDcols = cols]
    return(DT)
}    

3) Roland's

roland <- function(data, cols_to_fix) {
    tmp <- gsub("[_ ]", "", as.matrix(data[,cols_to_fix]))
    tmp[tmp=="n/a"] <- NA   
    data[,cols_to_fix] <- tmp
    return(data)
}

4) BrodieG's

brodieg <- function(data, cols_to_fix) {
    fix_fun <- function(x) gsub("(_| )", "", ifelse(x == "n/a", NA_character_, x))
    data[, cols_to_fix] <- apply(data[, cols_to_fix], 2, fix_fun)
    return(data)
}

5) Josilber's

josilber <- function(data, cols_to_fix) {
    colfun2 <- function(col) {
        col <- gsub("_", "", col)
        col <- gsub(" ", "", col)
        col <- ifelse(col=="n/a", NA, col)
        return(col)
    }
    data[,cols_to_fix] <- apply(data[,cols_to_fix], 2, colfun2)
    return(data)
}

2) benchmarking function:

We'll run this function 3 times and take the minimum of the run (removes cache effects) to be the runtime:

bench <- function(data, cols_to_fix) {
    ans <- c( 
        system.time(arun(data, cols_to_fix))["elapsed"], 
        system.time(martin(data, cols_to_fix))["elapsed"], 
        system.time(roland(data, cols_to_fix))["elapsed"], 
        system.time(brodieg(data, cols_to_fix))["elapsed"],
        system.time(josilber(data, cols_to_fix))["elapsed"]
    )
}

3) On (slightly) big data with just 2 cols to fix (like in OP's example here):

require(data.table)
set.seed(45)
K <- 1000; N <- 1e5
foo <- function(K) paste(sample(c(letters, "_", " "), 8, replace=TRUE), collapse="")
bar <- function(K) replicate(K, foo(), simplify=TRUE)
data <- data.frame(id1=sample(5, N, TRUE), 
                   id2=sample(5, N, TRUE), 
                   col3=sample(bar(K), N, TRUE), 
                   col4=sample(bar(K), N, TRUE)
        )

rown <- c("arun", "martin", "roland", "brodieg", "josilber")
coln <- paste("run", 1:3, sep="")
cols_to_fix <- c("col3","col4")
ans <- matrix(0L, nrow=5L, ncol=3L)
for (i in 1:3) {
    print(i)
    ans[, i] <- bench(data, cols_to_fix)
}
rownames(ans) <- rown
colnames(ans) <- coln

#           run1  run2  run3
# arun     0.149 0.140 0.142
# martin   0.643 0.629 0.621
# roland   1.741 1.708 1.761
# brodieg  1.926 1.919 1.899
# josilber 2.067 2.041 2.162
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think it makes sense to benchmark this with only two columns. –  Roland Jan 11 at 10:56

The apply version is the way to go. Looks like @josilber came up with the same answer, but this one is slightly different (note regexp).

fix_fun <- function(x) gsub("(_| )", "", ifelse(x == "n/a", NA_character_, x))
data[, cols_to_fix] <- apply(data[, cols_to_fix], 2, fix_fun)

More importantly, generally you want to use ddply and data.table when you want to do split-apply-combine analysis. In this case, all your data belongs to the same group (there aren't any subgroups you're doing anything different with), so you might as well use apply.

The 2 at the center of the apply statement means we want to subset the input by the 2nd dimension, and pass the result (in this case vectors, each representing a column from your data frame in cols_to_fix) to the function that does the work. apply then re-assembles the result, and we assign it back to the columns in cols_to_fix. If we had used 1 instead, apply would have passed the rows in our data frame to the function. Here is the result:

data
#   col1 col2 col3 col4
# 1    1    1   aa   vv
# 2    1    2   bb   ww
# 3    1    3   cc   xx
# 4    1    4   dd   yy
# 5    2    1   ee   zz
# 6    2    2 <NA> <NA>
# 7    2    3 <NA> <NA>
# 8    2    4 <NA> <NA>

If you do have sub-groups, then I recommend you use data.table. Once you get used to the syntax it's hard to beat for convenience and speed. It will also do efficient joins across data sets.

share|improve this answer
2  
Small correction: data.table is not a **split**-apply-combine approach. This misconception seems to have come up somehow. It doesn't split the huge data first and then apply. That'll be particularly terrible on big data (with presumably too many levels) both in computation time + space complexity. Instead data.table only allocates memory for the largest group, once. Then, it reuses the same memory cleverly (memory footprint is less) and evaluates function while looping thro' each group from C (for speed). –  Arun Jan 11 at 2:21
    
@Arun, thanks for the background details. I would still say that data.table is split-apply-combine when using by from a conceptual perspective. What the underlying implementation is doesn't really matter from that point of view. Even from a technical perspective, you are still splitting the original data, you are doing so iteratively instead of with an actual split. Clearly there is big difference performance wise, but again, from an end user perspective, it's still essentially a split. You are just being really clever about minimizing the footprint of the split. –  BrodieG Jan 11 at 3:02
    
And please, don't take this to be a criticism of data.table in any way. I think data.table is the most underrated package in R. And I don't say that because data.table is rated low, but rather, because data.table should be at the top of almost any "best packages in R" listing. –  BrodieG Jan 11 at 3:04
    
It does when you use it along with ddply in the same sentence. Because ddply first splits the entire data - stores the split data in a variable before apply+combine. This gives a wrong impression of what's going on under-the-hood. Reg. your conceptual perspective, then everything is split-apply-combine, isn't it? Including a for-loop - for Ex: x <- 1:100; y=integer(100L); for (i in 1:100) {tmp=x[i]; tmp2=tmp*2; y[i]=tmp2 } the data isn't actually being split here.. but by your definition, it's still "splitting" the original data. I disagree.I dint take your points the wrong way. –  Arun Jan 11 at 8:57
1  
I guess what I'm trying to say is: order matters (if not to you, to me :) ). In s-a-c, the data is split first, whatever function to apply is applied next and then combined. However, it doesn't work the same way here. To best describe this order would be: get groups first (1:10) -> subset by group (df$y[..]) -> apply (nothing in the ex: above) -> combine (done internally for lapply). –  Arun Jan 11 at 13:27

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